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Sappo Hill Glycerine Cream Soap Fragrance-Free Oatmeal -- 1 Bar


Sappo Hill Glycerine Cream Soap Fragrance-Free Oatmeal

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Sappo Hill Glycerine Cream Soap Fragrance-Free Oatmeal -- 1 Bar

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Sappo Hill Glycerine Cream Soap Fragrance-Free Oatmeal Description

  • Hand Crafted In Ashland, Oregon
  • All Vegetable Oil Glycerin Cream Soap
  • With Organic Oats
  • Gluten Free-Non GMO-Cruelty Free
  • Biodegradable
  • Paraben & Phthalate Free
  • Minimal Packaging
  • Wire-Cut
  • Exceptionally Mild
  • Fragrance Free

Sappo Hill's traditional kettle process carefully blends palm and coconut oils for their rich, skin moisturizing glycerin.  Each cake is wire-cut, air-dried and aged to create a long-lasting soap for exceptional mildness.

 

This small-batch, time consuming process is no longer used by American soap makers.  Our vegetable oil 'glycerine creme' soap comes in many colors with a variety of fragrances to please every nose.  One of our most popular fragrances is Oatmeal, which smells like oatmeal cookies and contains a generous amount of Organic oats.  There are three versions of oatmeal soap, all excellent choices for an oily skin type.

 

For those with sensitive skin, we offer three colorless, fragrance-free soaps -- Natural, Oatmeal Fragrance-Free, and Gardener's Fragrance-Free.

 

Bursting with a bountiful amount of Organic cornmeal, our gardeners' soaps are a natural abrasive for busy hands & fantastic for exfoliation.

 

All the glycerin naturally produced during the soap making process is retained in all Sappo Hill soap.  We are not like most soap companies who remove the glycerin for sale to the chemical industry.  Glycerin is a natural skin softener and contributes to the soap's longevity, preventing it from dissolving quickly in soap dishes or bath water.

 

Products of animal origin are not an ingredient in our soap or our manufacturing process.  Nor are animals used in our testing methods.  Packaging is minimal and as environmentally friendly as possible.

Free Of
GMOs, gluten, parabens, phthalates, animal cruelty, fragrance.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Ingredients: Non-GMO food grade oils from sustainable palm and coconut, water, sodium hydroxide, organic oats, glycerine.
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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What Causes Razor Burn & How Can I Prevent it?

Although there are many ways to remove unwanted body hair, including plucking, waxing, chemical depilatories, laser removal and electrolysis, shaving remains the most common, by far. Unfortunately, razor burn can be a nasty side effect of this popular hair removal method.

Read on to learn how to prevent, spot and treat the typically temporary skin condition.

Woman Carefully Shaving Legs in Tub to Prevent Razor Burn | Vitacost.com/Blog

What is razor burn?

If you have ever experienced a red, bumpy rash after shaving, it was probably razor burn. The irritating, sometimes painful, skin condition can impact any area of the body that comes in contact with a razor, including the legs, underarms, bikini area and face.

In addition to small red bumps on the skin, razor burn may be characterized by itching, tenderness and a stinging or burning sensation. Those with sensitive skin may be more susceptible to the condition.

Although similar in appearance, razor burn should not be confused with razor bumps, which occur when hair regrowth curls into the skin instead of penetrating the follicle.

What causes razor burn?

Wondering what brought on that telltale rash? Common cause of razor burn include:

  • Shaving without using shaving cream, soap and water or another lubricant (a.k.a. dry shaving)
  • Shaving with an old razor
  • Shaving with a razor blade that is dull or clogged with shaving cream, soap or hair
  • Shaving in the opposite direction of hair growth
  • Shaving in a hurry
  • Repeatedly shaving the same area
  • Using skin-irritating shaving products

How to prevent razor burn

Obviously, it’s better to combat razor burn than to treat it. The best way to do so is to practice a proper shaving technique:

  • Clean your skin prior to shaving
  • Always use a sharp razor (replace blades regularly)
  • Consider using a single-blade razor if you have sensitive skin*
  • Wet your skin (and allow water to sit for two minutes) before shaving
  • Use shaving cream, soap and water or another lubricant
  • Only shave in the direction of hair growth
  • Lightly pat your skin dry after shaving
  • Apply a moisturizer to your skin after shaving

You can also help prevent razor burn by using an electric razor or choosing a different hair removal method, such as sugaring at home, shaving less often or stopping altogether.

* Please note: Although multiple-blade razors typically provide a closer shave, they are more likely than single-blade razors to cause razor burn in individuals with sensitive skin.

How to get rid of razor burn

Treating razor burn typically involves gently addressing the symptoms and waiting for the condition to subside. It is best to refrain from shaving the affected area until it has fully healed.

To relieve itching and burning, apply a cool washcloth, aloe vera or avocado oil to the skin. To eliminate dryness, rinse the affected area and pat it dry. Then lather on an emollient, such as aftershave, lotion, moisturizer or coconut oil.

To help reduce inflammation, soak in a soothing oatmeal bath, apply apple cider vinegar or equal parts water and tea tree oil to the area, or use an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream.

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