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Aleve Naproxen Sodium Pain Reliever - Fever Reducer -- 220 mg - 80 Liquid Gels


Aleve Naproxen Sodium Pain Reliever - Fever Reducer
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Aleve Naproxen Sodium Pain Reliever - Fever Reducer -- 220 mg - 80 Liquid Gels

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Aleve Naproxen Sodium Pain Reliever - Fever Reducer Description

  • All Day Strong®
  • Aleve Pain Reliever/Fever Reducer
  • Strength To Last 12 Hours
  • Liquid Gels (Liquid) Filled Capsules

Aleve Liquid Gels are a great way to relieve your pain instead of letting your pain manage you. Just 2 capsules provides all day pain relief from minor aches and pains. Each pill has the strength to last 12 hours.

• Comes in a soft, liquid-filled capsule
• Just 2 liquid gels can manage pain all day.
• For minor aches and pains due to minor arthritis, back and body aches, and headache


Directions

• do not take more than directed

• the smallest effective dose should be used

• drink a full glass of water with each dose

• if taken with food, this product may take longer to work

 

Adults and children 12 years and older

• take 1 capsule every 8 to 12 hours while symptoms last

• for the first dose you may take 2 caplets within the first hour

• do not exceed 2 capsules in any 8- to 12-hour period

• do not exceed 3 capsules in a 24-hour period

 

Children under 12 years

• ask a doctor

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Drug Facts
Serving Size: 1 Capsule
Servings per Container: 80
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Naproxen Sodium (naproxen 200 mg) (NSAID)*
*nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug
220 mg
Other Ingredients: FD&C blue #1 lake, gelatin, glycerin, lactic acid, mannitol, pharmaceutical ink, polyethylene glycol, povidone, proylene glycol, purified water, sorbitan, sorbitol.
Warnings

Allergy alert: Naproxen sodium may cause a severe allergic reaction, especially in people allergic to aspirin. Symptoms may include: • hives • facial swelling • asthma (wheezing) • shock • skin reddening • rash • blisters

If allergic reaction occurs, stop use and seek medical help right away.

 

Stomach bleeding warning: This product contains NSAID, which may cause severe stomach bleeding. The chance is higher if you:

• are age 60 or older

• have had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems

• take blood thinning (anticoagulant) or steroid drug

• take other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or others)

• have 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product

• take more or for a longer time than directed

Heart attack and stroke warning: NSAIDs, except aspirin, increase the risk of heart attack, heart failure, and stroke. These can be fatal. The risk is higher if you use more than directed or for longer than directed.

Do not use

• if you have ever had an allergic reaction to any other pain reliever/fever reducer

• right before or after heart surgery

Ask a doctor before use if

• the stomach bleeding warning applies to you

• you have a history of stomach problems, such as heartburn

• you have high blood pressure, heart disease, liver cirrhosis, kidney disease, asthma, or had a stroke

• you are taking diuretic

• you have problems or serious side effects from taking pain relievers or fever reducers

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are

• under a doctor's care for any serious condition

• taking aspirin for heart attack or stroke, because naproxen may decrease this benefit of aspirin

• taking any other drug

When using this product

• take with food or milk if stomach upset occurs

Stop use and ask a doctor if

you experience any of the following signs of stomach bleeding:

• feel faint • vomit blood • have bloody or black stools • have stomach pain that does not get better

you have symptoms of heart problems or stoke: • chest pain • trouble breathing • weakness in one art or side of body • slurred speech • leg swelling

• pain gets worse or lasts more than 10 days

• fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days

• you have difficulty swallowing

• it feels like the pill is stick in your throat

• redness or swelling is present in the painful area

• any new symptoms appear

If pregnant or beast-feeding, ask a health professional before use. It is especially important not to use naproxen sodium during the last 3 months of pregnancy unless definitely directed to do so by a doctor because if may cause problems in the unborn child or complications during deliver.

In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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The Best Types of Exercise to Help With Chronic Pain

A recent survey from the International Association for the Study of Pain reveals that 50 million adults in the United States suffer chronic pain on a daily basis. Overall, one in five American adults experience a form of chronic pain to at least some degree. The survey also found that the most common areas of the body for chronic pain include the back, hips, knees and feet. While there are many rehabilitative and pharmaceutical methods to treat chronic pain, basic physical exercise is often one of the most accessible and effective treatment options available. Woman Stretching on Yoga Mat in Living Room to Represent Exercise for Chronic Pain Concept | Vitacost.com/blog If you’re struggling with chronic pain, here’s what you need to know about exercise as an intervention to manage or, in some cases, even heal chronic pain. Remember to check with your health practitioner to be sure exercise is a supportive option for you.

How often should you exercise with chronic pain?

All demographics can benefit from exercise to alleviate and protect against chronic pain, but certain age brackets have different exercise needs. Most adults between 18 and 64 require 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week, with at least two days a week of resistance training, according to the CDC. Those over the age of 65 require additional balance improvement exercises too.

How does exercise help?

Some chronic pain issues can restrict mobility which then makes exercise a challenge. This is especially true among senior adults who experience a loss of muscle tissue and bone density as a result of more frequent injuries or sedentary behaviors, suggests Clinical Interventions in Aging. If you are able to exercise, you may find that it helps to restore functionality in painful muscles, joints, tissues and bones, while increasing your mental resilience to pain. The British Journal of Sports Medicine explains that when you avoid exercising a certain body part due to cognitive pain-related fears, this can worsen the physiological experience of pain or sometimes even cause autoimmune reactions like tissue damage and inflammation. However, a consistent, intentional effort to push through those fears and perform some kind of exercise will lessen the perceived threat. This mental fortitude, in turn, can stimulate physical recovery.

Which types of exercise are the most effective for alleviating chronic pain?

Not all exercise is created equal when it comes to managing and healing chronic pain. For example, long-term running may not be a good fit for someone with chronic knee pain while light resistance training for the lower body could be. Consider the various styles of fitness best-suited for moving your body with chronic pain.

Low-Impact Cardio

Cardiovascular exercises are ideal for those with chronic pain. The aerobic nature of these workouts will increase oxygen uptake to boost circulation and ease pressure on the joints, resulting in less pain, explains the PLOS One Journal. PLOS One also reports that cardio workouts can reduce symptoms of fatigue, depression and anxiety. This can particularly benefit fibromyalgia patients whose musculoskeletal pain often intersects with a mental health issue. Some low-impact cardio options include swimming, walking or cycling.

Resistance Training

Full-body resistance exercises strengthen your muscles while also stabilizing your center of gravity (core, hips and back). This can improve balance and posture, lowering your risk of chronic pain or injuries. In fact, a study in the BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation Journal found that resistance training workouts can help manage the effects of pain-related disabilities, enhance daily functioning and boost energy levels. Most basic resistance training can be done with your own bodyweight. If you’re not sure where to start, work with a trainer or physical therapist who understands your chronic pain issues and can guide you safely into a workout routine that’s supportive.

Gentle Stretches

Stretching before and after a workout is crucial for lubricating the joints and preventing fitness-related injuries. Stretches also release physical tension and stiffness which, over time, can manifest as chronic pain. Ergonomic and desk stretches, in particular, alleviate the pressure that builds in your neck, shoulders and back as a result of stress or activities like sitting in front of a computer. While the relief might not be immediate, when done consistently, stretching will both ease the pain and lower the chances of recurrence, according to the Journal of Clinical Medicine. As with resistance training, opt for stretches that activate all regions of the body, not just areas where you have pain.

Are there risk factors to be aware of?

It’s important to know the threshold of what your own body can handle. Consult with a physical therapist or medical professional before you start a new fitness regimen, as they can create a plan to gradually ease into the workout at a comfortable, moderate pace. Don’t forget to listen to your body’s internal cues and make periodic adjustments if necessary to accommodate pain fluctuation. You might need to curb the intensity at times or take an extra day off to recover. Remember, exercise is a tool to strengthen and rejuvenate the body—not to cause it more strain and discomfort.

Exercise for chronic pain

Use this guide to better understand how you can manage your chronic pain with exercise. With guidance from a professional health practitioner or physical therapist, you can feel physical and mental relief while getting stronger at the same time.

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