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Alter Eco Organic Classic Dark Truffles Dark Chocolate -- 4.2 oz


Alter Eco Organic Classic Dark Truffles Dark Chocolate

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Alter Eco Organic Classic Dark Truffles Dark Chocolate -- 4.2 oz

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Alter Eco Organic Classic Dark Truffles Dark Chocolate Description

  • Enlightened Indulgence
  • Dark Chocolate Truffles
  • Made with Pure Coconut Oil
  • USDA Organic
  • Fair Trade Certified
  • Gluten Free
  • Non-GMO Project Verified
  • Made In Switzerland

A Classic Redefined

Fans of our award-winning bars will recognize the deep, smooth Ecuadorian chocolate surrounding these sumptuous truffles. Inside, nourishing coconut oil meets milk and cacao for a center so creamy, its virtues will melt your defenses.

 

Indulgence, enlightened

These truffles are as organic, fair trade, gluten free, and non-GMO as it gets.  And the amazing silky, melty texture inside comes form pure organic coconut oil - a sustainable alternative to palm kernel oil.  We believe the old cliché is actually true:  we are what we eat.  So let's all be mindfully delicious.

 

Coconut Oil: Goodness all around

Why coconut oil? Its been used for thousands of years by cultures all over the world for its qualities.  We use only the pure organic variety in our truffles for the amazing silky, melty texture it adds -and, importantly, to support a sustainable alternative to palm kernel oil.

 

Free Of
GMOs, gluten.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 3 Pieces (36 g)
Servings per Container: About 3
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories230
   Calories from Fat170
Total Fat19 g29%
   Saturated Fat13 g65%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium0 mg0%
Total Carbohydrate15 g5%
   Dietary Fiber2 g8%
   Sugars12 g
Protein1 g
Vitamin A00%
Vitamin C00%
Calcium00%
Iron015%
Other Ingredients: *Organic raw cane sugar, *organic cocao beans, *organic coconut oil, *organic cocoa butter, organic whole milk, *organic vanilla beans, natural flavors.
Contains Milk and coconut. Made on equipment shared with tree nuts and soy.
*Fair Trade Certified™.
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Earth-Conscious Eating: What is the Climatarian Diet?

We’ve got diets galore — Atkins, keto, vegan and South Beach, to name a few. Now, there’s a new kind on the block: the Climatarian diet. As its name suggests, the Climatarian diet revolves around eating foods based on their effects on the climate. More specifically, it involves choosing foods with a low carbon footprint. Climatarian Diet Represented by Plate with Earth Ball and Utensils Surrounded by Fresh Fruits & Veggies | Vitacost.com/blog“You can use your power as a consumer to drive down the production of the types of meat which have the biggest impact on our climate,” the Less Meat Less Heat group says of the Climatarian diet. The group explains that adhering to the Climatarian diet requires a basic knowledge of the carbon footprint of meat and dairy products. Even without that knowledge, anyone adopting the Climatarian diet should know this: Beef, lamb and goat rank as the meats with the largest carbon footprints. According to Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, production of animal-based foods typically generates higher greenhouse gas emissions than production of plant-based foods. On the scale of greenhouse gas emissions, beef, lamb and goat rank highest among animal-based foods. Next in line are dairy (milk and cheese), pork and poultry.

How to follow the Climatarian diet

So, if you were to stick to a Climatarian diet, you would cut back on beef, lamb, goat, pork, poultry and dairy from your diet, or even eliminate them altogether. What would that leave on the plate of possibilities? Fortunately, the plate is pretty full. Among foods that deliver a low carbon footprint, these are the ones with the lowest amount of greenhouse gas emissions per gram of protein (listed from least to greatest effect on the climate), according to the Chan School of Public Health: Taking those low-footprint items into a consideration, a Climatarian diet closely mirrors a vegan diet or vegetarian diet. You need not jump into a full-scale meatless Climatarian diet in order to help the climate, though. Rather, the American Lung Association points out, we need a large-scale movement toward plant-rich diets. “If 50% of the population tries to eat more plant-based and cut down on meat and dairy in the ways they can, that will have a tremendously larger impact than 5% of the population going full vegan,” the Lung Association says. To ease yourself into a Climatarian diet, the Lung Association recommends swapping out the meat in your meal with a plant-based protein a few times a week. Among the protein alternatives are chickpeas, beans, lentils, eggplant, cauliflower, tofu, tempeh, seitan and falafel. The Climatarian diet is similar to the Reducetarian diet, which stresses eating fewer animal products, such as red meat, poultry, seafood, dairy and eggs. For Climatarian recipe ideas, The New York Times suggests checking out the Kuri app. (“Climatarian” appeared on the Times’ list of the top food words for 2015.) When you’re dining out, you might try restaurants like Chipotle, Just Salad and Panera Bread, which emphasize Climatarian items on their menus. There are even Climatarian-friendly food brands like Moonshot.

Positive impacts of the Climatarian diet

Now, why does all of this matter in the context of climate change? “Our food system contributes over 30% of global greenhouse gas emissions,” the Lung Association says, “and current levels of meat and dairy consumption in high-income countries such as the United States are incompatible with remaining within a livable degree of global warming. Even if we were to eliminate the fossil fuel industry, the emissions from our food system alone would keep us in an unsafe position with the climate crisis.” In particular, meat contributes significantly to methane emissions, which cause more short-term harm than carbon dioxide does, according to the Lung Association. Aside from tweaking your diet, you can commit to a Climatarian lifestyle by paying attention to whether the meat you buy is locally sourced or factory-farmed, according to Rockefeller University. Locally sourced meat produces fewer greenhouse gas emissions because it takes less energy to transport the meat than factory-farmed meat does. In addition, you can promote a Climatarian lifestyle by avoiding packaged foods with lengthy lists of ingredients, Rockefeller University says. Why? Because each ingredient likely adds to the toll taken on the climate by greenhouse gases. “Challenge yourself to try one of these practices every week, either one at a time or cumulatively,” Rockefeller University advises. “Mix and match until you find the habits that work for you, minimizing your footprint while maximizing your other priorities.”
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