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Artisan Tropic Cassava Strips Sea Salt -- 4.5 oz


Artisan Tropic Cassava Strips Sea Salt
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Artisan Tropic Cassava Strips Sea Salt -- 4.5 oz

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Artisan Tropic Cassava Strips Sea Salt Description

  • Snacking Redefined
  • Nothing But Real Ingredients
  • No Preservatives
  • Vegan
  • Certified Paleo
  • Cassava is Naturally Gluten Free
  • Non-GMO Project Verified

Our Story

Artisan Tropic is a family adventure fueled by our family's passion for healthy living.

 

We love to eat healthy. Why? In 2011, our youngest daughter was very sick, but after making some drastic dietary changes her body began to heal. This experience taught us the importance of whole food nutrition and made us passionate about eating healthy. Our desire is to share our family's healthy adventure with you!

 

What is Cassava

Cassava, also known as Manioc or Yuca, is a tuber originating in South America and eaten in may tropical and subtropical regions worldwide.

The cassava starch pellets are also known as tapioca.

 

Here's Why You Love Our Cassava (Aka Yuca)!

A staple in Tropical Cooking, cassava is Grain-Free and has a Low-Glycemic Index.

• Cassava doesn't contain Nightshades - fancy way of saying it doesn't cause inflammation, like potatoes do.

• Thinly sliced and seasoned with only the best ingredients, our Strips are the perfect way to upgrade your chips.

 

 

Free Of
Gluten, GMOs, preservatives, peanuts and tree nuts.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: (30 g) (About 13 Pieces)
Servings per Container: About 4
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories140
Total Fat5 g6%
   Saturated Fat2.5 g12%
   Trans Fat0 g
   Polyunsaturated Fat0.5 g
   Monounsaturated Fat2.5 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium67 mg3%
Total Carbohydrates23 g8%
   Dietary Fiber2 g8%
   Total Sugars5 g
     Includes 0g Added Sugars0%
Protein less than1 g
Vitamin D0 mcg0%
Calcium0 mg0%
Iron0 mg0%
Potassium160 mg4%
Other Ingredients: Cassava, non-hydrogenated palm oil, sea salt.
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Get Your Snack On: Tips for Enjoying Chips & Dip (Without the Guilt!)

Chips and dips are a modern-day American snacking tradition. We find endless excuses to indulge - from sitting on the couch at home and watching TV, to joining friends to party at a bar.

But that tasty snack has a darker side.

"Let's face it -- chips are not a nutritious food," says Carrie Dennett, a registered dietitian nutritionist who lives in the Pacific Northwest and is the owner of Nutrition By Carrie.

Overhead View of Slate Slab Filled With Sweet Potato Chops and Dip to Represent Celebrating National Chip and Dip Day | Vitacost.com/blog

Eating chips occasionally is not a problem for most folks, particularly if they eat healthfully most of the time.  

But in many cases, people eat far too many salty, fat-laden chips, and cover them in dips that also are low in nutrition, and high in added salt, sugar and fat.

"The worst thing about this snack may be how we eat it," Dennett says.

Typically, people don't portion out a dollop of dip and a handful of chips with the intention of eating them mindfully, she says.

"Instead, we take a chip out of a large bowl or bag, dip it into a bowl of dip, eat it and repeat, repeat, repeat," Dennett says.

Because many of us eat chips straight out of the bag, it can be "virtually impossible to know exactly how much we've eaten," she adds.

Eating chips more mindfully

March 23 is National Chip and Dip Day. So, go ahead and celebrate by snacking – just do so more mindfully.

Dennett urges you to watch portion sizes closely and to remember that eating chips is "an enjoyable treat, not a way of fueling our bodies."

She says slowing down and eating more mindfully can be helpful. Dennett recommends savoring your chips so you can wring maximum enjoyment out of the snack. In particular, pay attention to:

  • The crunch of the chips
  • The creaminess of the dip
  • The interplay of salty, savory and spicy

"This makes it easier to be satisfied with a reasonable portion," Dennett says.

More healthful chip and dip day ideas

Chips are chips. Although baked varieties may be more healthful than other types of chips, there is only so much you can do to boost a chip’s health quotient.

You may have more success in creating a healthful dip, however.

"Some dips offer some real nutrition," Dennett says. "It all depends on the ingredients."

For example, bean-based dips like hummus and vegetable-based dips like salsa and spinach dip can be good options. So are dips made with Greek yogurt.

"Many people like the action of dunking and dipping, so a snack of raw vegetables and hummus can be a fun, flavorful and very nutritious snack," Dennett says.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has even gotten in on the act by recommending a somewhat more healthful alternative to traditional chips and dip – a recipe for tortilla chips and bean dip that can be found on the ChooseMyPlate.gov website.

However, even if you don’t take such steps to make your chipping and dipping more healthful, you can still enjoy this treat – as long as you do so in moderation.

“No single food makes or breaks how nutritious our diet is,” Dennett says. “If someone eats healthy overall, but really loves chips and dip as a treat --  and is able to stick to reasonable portions sizes -- then that's great.”

Problems only emerge for those who use chips and dip as their “go-to snack” and who eat poorly in the rest of their diet, Dennett says.

“Then, there's a bigger problem that deserves attention if health is something that's important to them,” she says. “It's no longer just about the chips and dip.”

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