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AZO Urinary Pain Relief™ Maximum Strength -- 24 Tablets


AZO Urinary Pain Relief™ Maximum Strength
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    $0.41 per serving

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AZO Urinary Pain Relief™ Maximum Strength -- 24 Tablets

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AZO Urinary Pain Relief™ Maximum Strength Description

  • Fast Effective Pain Relief
  • More Active Ingredient Relieves Pain, Burning & Urgency
  • Targets The Source Of Pain
  • 97.5 mg Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride

Use Relief from urinary pain, burning, urgency and frequency associated with urinary tract infections.


Directions

Adults and children 12 years and older: Take 2 tablets 3 times daily with or after meals as needed for up to two days. Take with a full glass of water. Children under 12: Do not use without consulting a doctor. Do not use for more than 2 days (12 tablets) without consulting a doctor.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Drug Facts
Serving Size: 1 Tablet
Servings per Container: 24
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride (Urinary analgesic)97.5 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Corn starch, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, pharmaceutical glaze, polyvinylpyrrolidone, pregelatinized starch, silicon dioxide and talc.
Warnings

Please read insert for important precautions.

Ask a doctor before use if you have kidney disease; allergies to foods, preservatives or dyes; had a hypersensitive reaction to Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride.

Do not use if you have Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency unless approved by your physician.

When using this product stomach upset may occur, taking this product with or after meals may reduce stomach upset; your urine will become reddish-orange in color. This is not harmful, but care should be taken to avoid staining clothing or other items.

Stop use and ask a doctor if your symptoms last for more than 2 days; you suspect you are having an adverse reaction to the medication.

If pregnant or breastfeeding, ask a health professional before use.

In case of accidental overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

 

Other Information This product can interfere with laboratory tests including urine, glucose (sugar), and ketones test. This product may stain soft contact lenses and other items if handled after touching tablets.

The product you receive may contain additional details or differ from what is shown on this page, or the product may have additional information revealed by partially peeling back the label. We recommend you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Waking up to Use the Bathroom at Night? Why it Happens, and What to Do

If you’ve ever lied in bed at night with an uncontrollable urge to pee, a compulsion that you can’t renege on, you have had a minor bout of nocturia. Officially defined as waking up more than once during sleep to urinate, nocturia is an order of magnitude beyond the typical “well I’m up might as well pee” situation.

Person Turning on Bedside Lamp to Represent Concept of Frequent Urination at Night | Vitacost.com/blog

What is nocturia?

With nocturia, you literally have no choice but to get up and void your bladder. Getting up in the night, especially if it’s more than once, can cause sleep disruption, which in turn can impact quality of life. The more times a night you get up to void your bladder, the more severe the nocturia is considered. If you have this problem, you’re not alone, nearly 1 in 3 adults over age 30 experience nocturia. It can be caused by underlying health issues or lifestyle habits and tends to increase with age. When it comes to causes, there are a variety of reasons you may be experiencing nocturia.

Health issues that lead to nocturia (frequent urination at night)

Health issues include central nervous system disorders, which impair your ability to inhibit your urge to pee. Any condition, including sleep apnea, that impacts your brain function can impair your ability to control your bladder urges. Cardiovascular disorders can also affect nocturia, because they cause the body to retain a great deal of fluid during the daytime. At night, the kidneys go into overdrive, producing a lot more urine, which leads to nocturia. The most common types of disease that cause this problem are congestive heart failure and severe varicose vein disease. An overactive bladder often leads to a decreased capacity to hold urine and exacerbates the urge to void both day and night. Additionally, the bladder muscle can become disordered in many disease processes. Such conditions include diabetes, bladder cancer, cystitis, urinary tract infection, bladder stones, vaginal atrophy, pelvic prolapse, pelvic tumors, age-related atrophy of bladder muscle and enlarged prostate. Certain medications can cause you to urinate more frequently, including diuretics, cardiac glycosides, demeclocycline, lithium, methoxyflurane, phenytoin, propoxyphene and excessive vitamin D.

Lifestyle habits that can cause nocturia

  • Drinking too much fluid, especially just before bedtime (especially caffeine or alcohol).
  • Behavioral patterns such as training yourself to wake up during the night to use the bathroom, even if you don't necessarily have to go.

Ways to manage frequent urination at night

The first obvious thing you can do is check your fluid intake. The golden rule is to drink half your body weight in ounces each day, so if you weigh 120 pounds aim for 60 ounces of fluid per day. To ensure input and output is working correctly, monitor your fluid output. Your doctor can also provide you with a way to assess your urinary output. If possible, time intake of diuretics or other urination-inducing medications (take them mid- to late afternoon, six hours before bedtime). If the amount of urine you produce isn’t too high, then you may have an issue with fully emptying your bladder. This can be due to bladder obstruction. Some women experience urinary retention due to bladder spasms, bladder inflammation and bladder pain (interstitial cystitis). Assess for a health condition: Consult with your doctor to make sure you don’t have a urinary tract infection (symptoms include frequent and painful urination and occasionally blood in urine) and to rule out a metabolic disorder such as diabetes. Ask yourself: Have there been changes in your sleep patterns? If yes, consider getting an Oura ring to track your sleep patterns. If your sleep has changed dramatically, see your doctor to find out why you might be experiencing these changes. Note some endocrine issues like hyperthyroidism (excess thyroid hormone) can be related to poor sleep. If you are a female in your 30s and 40s, and you have increased urination at night consider seeing your gynecologist—you may have a fibroid that is pressing on your bladder causing you to have increased urge to urinate. If you are in menopause and experience some incontinence or leaking of a bit of urine when you cough or sneeze or jump, you may be having increased urination due to connective tissue changes in your vulva/vaginal/urethral area. The angle of the urethra changes when a woman’s estrogen levels drop due to changes in the architecture of the tissue—connective tissue break down—and the tissue thins and dries. See your gynecologist for possible hormonal solution such as vaginal estrogen. Finally, particularly if you have had children, your pelvic floor may have become weakened. Post childbirth is a great time to start doing Kegels to strengthen the pelvic floor and specifically the PC muscle (pubococcygeal muscle), the primary muscle that hold up the internal organs of the lower pelvis. If all else fails, there are medications you can take to reduce the symptoms of an overactive bladder or assist the kidneys in producing less urine. Consult with your doctor about whether any of those prescriptions would be appropriate for you.

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