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BareOrganics Noni Fruit Powder Raw -- 8 oz


BareOrganics Noni Fruit Powder Raw
  • Our price: $15.99

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BareOrganics Noni Fruit Powder Raw -- 8 oz

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BareOrganics Noni Fruit Powder Raw Description

  • Superfoods to Nourish Your Life
  • Raw Powder
  • Vitamin C
  • Polysaccharides
  • Iron
  • USDA Organic
  • Gluten Free
  • Non-GMO
  • Vegan

Noni Fruit

Often referred to as the "Queen of Health Plants." Noni is one of the most nourishing fruits known to Polynesian herbalists. Native to tropical climates, this bright green fruit flourishes throughout Southeast Asia, and is a popular base to juice, teas and culinary dishes. Noni is thought to be ultra-protective of the body, with nutritious vitamins, minerals, and polysaccharides as part of its nutritional profile.

 

Raw • Organic • Vegan • Gluten Free • Non-GMO

 

Benefits: Overall health & vitality.


Directions

Suggested Use: Mix one teaspoon (1 scoop) with juice, yogurt or add to your favorite smoothie.

 

Store in a cool, dry place away from sunlight and moisture.

Free Of
Gluten, GMOs.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Scoop (2 g)
Servings per Container: About 114
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories0
Dietary Fiber less than1 g1%
Protein less than1 g1%
Vitamin C3 mg3%
Calcium13 mg1%
Iron0.6 mg4%
Organic Noni Fruit Powder (Morinda citrifolia)2 g*
*Daily value not established.
Warnings

If you are pregnant or lactating, consult a health care professional before using this product.

 

Note: Silica packet included to help maintain freshness. Do not consume.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Making Smoothies: Are You Doing it Wrong?

Blending a smoothie is a fast and delicious way to quickly satisfy your hunger. Do it right, and you can also add a wealth of vitamins and minerals to your diet.

But not all smoothies are created equal, and even the best and most nutritious smoothie recipes come with some caveats.

Torso View of Woman Learning How to Make a Smoothie Pouring Milk Into a Blender with Fruit | Vitacost.com/blog

Downing a smoothie can make sense in some situations. For example, data has shown that obtaining protein and carbohydrate in liquid form might help it get into the muscle much faster than it would in a mixed meal, says Angela Lemond, a Plano, Texas-based registered dietitian nutritionist and founder of Lemond Nutrition.

“The advantage here would be after a workout,” she says. “It may maximize muscle building and decrease muscle soreness.”

Drinking smoothies also can be a great way to eat foods that many people instinctively do not enjoy – such as spinach or kale – and that offer important vitamins and minerals. The mix of flavors in a green smoothie disguises the taste of foods that some find unpalatable.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture also lauds smoothies as way to increase fruit and vegetable intake, and to add foods such as flaxseed, kefir and herbs to your diet. Smoothies also can add a dose of protein and calcium into your daily meal plan.

The downsides of smoothies

However, even the best smoothies have downsides. For starters, Lemond notes that blending fruit into a smoothie can boost natural sugar totals much higher than what you would take in if you ate the fruit whole.

“It's really the potential caloric load,” she says. “Since they are blenderized, the concentration of the calories can go high really quick even with good quality ingredients.”

Others have warned that adding high-sugar yogurt and unhealthy ice cream to smoothies can outweigh the potential health benefits of such a drink.

For most people, it makes more sense to consume healthful fruits and vegetables in ways that don’t rely on blending them, Lemond says.

“The digestion process is a natural thing the body does to slowly process food for sustained energy,” she says. “Blenderizing does some of the work for the body, so the food does not stay in the system as long.”

As a result, smoothies are less likely to satisfy your hunger as effectively as a mixed, whole meal, she says.

How to make a smoothie the right way

Despite such concerns, smoothies can still be a great way to for some people to get important nutrients they otherwise might miss.

A 2015 study found that when fruit smoothies were introduced as a breakfast item at two Utah high schools, the percentage of students who consumed the equivalent of at least one serving of whole fruit each day soared from 4.3 percent prior to the menu change to a whopping 45.1 percent after.

If you love to consume smoothies, make sure you do it right. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests consuming smoothies without adding any sugar.

The natural fruit in a smoothie should provide more than enough sweetness, the CDC says.

Lemond suggests the following recipe:

  • 8 ounces of milk or milk alternative
  • 1 cup of a fruit of your choice
  • And unlimited amount of a vegetable of your choice
  • 10 to 20 grams of a protein source of your choice -- protein powder, nut or seed
  • Ice or additional water as desired

Such a recipe provides a nice balance of macronutrients such as carbohydrates, fat and protein, she says. Still, Lemond urges you to make a smoothie a relatively rare treat.

“Smoothies are best used when recovering from a workout, if at all,” she says.

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