skip to main content

Christopher's Herbal Eye Formula -- 475 mg - 100 Vegetarian Capsules


Christopher's Herbal Eye Formula
In stock
View Similar Products
  • +

Added to My List as a guest.

Your guest list will be saved temporarily during your shopping session.

Sign in to add items to your saved list(s).

1 item added to your list

Christopher's Herbal Eye Formula -- 475 mg - 100 Vegetarian Capsules

Oops! Something went wrong and we were unable to process your request. Please try again.

15% off: Hurry, enter promo code 15VMHS at checkout by 9/22 at 9 a.m. ET to save!

Christopher's Herbal Eye Formula Description

A synergistic blend of whole food herbs for the eyes.

The eyes are probably the most important organ connected to the senses. We use our eyes everyday for literally every task our body performs. Some vitamins & nutrients that help prevent the eye from certain age-related issues are not found in many common foods. This is why taking supplements for eye health is important before our later years.

Dr. Christopher's Herbal Eye formula was designed to support optimal eye health.


Directions

As a dietary supplement take 2 capsules 2 times a day or as directed by your health care professional.
Free Of
Added fillers and chemicals.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 2 Vegetarian Capsules
Servings per Container: 50
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Proprietary Blend: Wildcrafted Bayberry Bark, Wildcrafted Goldenseal Root, Organic Red Raspberry Leaf, Wildcrafted Marshmallow Root, Eyebright 4:1 Extract Powder, Wildcrafted Eyebright Herb, & Cayenne Pepper 40 MHU950 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Plant derived capsule
Warnings

 

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
View printable version Print Page

How to Protect Your Eyes From the Harmful Effects of the Sun

Summer is the time to splash in the water, bike a great trail or perfect your putt on the golf course. However, the sun poses a danger to your vision that can quickly cloud visions of outdoor fun.

Fail to protect your eyes today, and you’ll likely pay for it tomorrow, says Diane Bovenkamp, vice president of scientific affairs for BrightFocus Foundation, a Clarksburg, Maryland-based nonprofit that supports research into medical conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration. 

“Everyone — especially people who already have eye problems — should protect their eyes from the ultraviolet light found in sunshine,” she says.

Woman Wearing Hat and Sunglasses to Protect Eyes from Sun Damage | Vitacost.com/blog

How the sun damages your eyes

Ultraviolet — or “UV” — light causes sunburn, but it also can damage the eye’s surface and internal structures, leading to conditions such as cataracts. Many studies also suggest that this type of light — which is not part of the visible spectrum of light — also contributes to macular degeneration, Bovenkamp says.

“The effects are cumulative,” she says. “The more exposed your eyes are to UV rays, the higher the risk of damage to the cornea, retina and lens becomes.”

In addition, the thinning of the Earth’s ozone layer has reduced its ability to function as a UV filter. “It is now more dangerous than ever to eyes and skin to spend unprotected hours in the sun,” Bovenkamp says.

Steps to take that protect your eyes

Fortunately, there are many things you can do to protect your eyes for a lifetime of healthy vision.

“The simplest way to protect against possible retinal light damage is to wear sunglasses and a hat,” she says.

When shopping for sunglasses, the American Optometric Association recommends choosing a pair that block 99 to 100 percent of two types of ultraviolet rays -- UVA and UVB – and that screen out 75 to 90 percent of visible light, the shorter-wavelength blue and violet light that can damage your retina.

The AOA also recommends choosing gray lenses, which do not interfere with your ability to see color.

“Large lenses are better than small ones, and wraparound lenses are even better,” Bovenkamp says. That’s because UV rays can enter the eyeball from the sides, above and below.

“If you aren’t sure about the quality of your sunglasses, ask your optometrist or optician to check their protection level,” Bovenkamp says.

Regular, colorless prescription lenses also can provide protection against the sun’s harmful rays. Again, ask an eye professional for more guidance about such lenses.

Contact lenses may provide some protection but only to the part of the eye that they actually cover,” Bovenkamp says. “So, you should still wear sunglasses.”

When selecting a hat, make sure it provides a proper amount of coverage for your eyes. Bovenkamp says the brim should be wide enough to prevent sunlight from creeping in the sides, or reflecting off surfaces like water or snow.

“In addition to lowering your risk of eye diseases, hats can help shield your face and neck, where skin cancers can form,” she says.

Protecting your eyes in every circumstance

Remember to protect your eyes in all conditions, not just on sunny days. Clouds don’t block ultraviolet light, so wear sunglasses on cloudy or overcast days.

Eye protection is especially important at the beach or in snow, Bovenkamp says.

“Water and sand reflect, and thus increase the intensity of UV rays from 10 to 20 percent,” Bovenkamp says. “Snow can reflect up to 80 percent.”

If you have children or teens at home, make sure they wear proper eye protection in the sun. Because sun damage is cumulative, it’s especially important to avoid the sun’s harmful rays from a young age, Bovenkamp says.

While wearing sunglasses and a good hat can help protect your eyesight, they are not sufficient to completely protect your vision.

So, Bovenkamp recommends having a comprehensive dilated eye exam regularly after age 40, or annually if your health professional recommends it.

Sponsored Link
Sign Up & Save

Get exclusive offers, free shipping events, expert health tips & more by signing up for our promotional emails.

Please enter a valid zip code
FLDC17
31839