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Earth's Best Sesame Street Organic Letter of the Day Cookies Oatmeal Cinnamon -- 5.3 oz


Earth's Best Sesame Street Organic Letter of the Day Cookies Oatmeal Cinnamon
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Earth's Best Sesame Street Organic Letter of the Day Cookies Oatmeal Cinnamon -- 5.3 oz

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Earth's Best Sesame Street Organic Letter of the Day Cookies Oatmeal Cinnamon Description

  • Yummy & Tasty
  • Excellent Source of Iron & Zinc & 6 B Vitamins
  • USDA Organic
  • Non-GMO Project Verified
  • Kosher

Learning the ABC’s has never been tastier. Earth’s Best Organic® Oatmeal Cinnamon Organic Letter of the Day Cookies provide your little one with great taste and an excellent source of iron, zinc and six B vitamins.

 

Key Benefits:

  • Excellent source of Iron, Zinc and 6 B Vitamins
  • No artificial flavors or colors
  • USDA Certified Organic
  • Made with non-GMO ingredients
  • For toddlers 2 years and older


Directions

This product should be fed to toddlers only when they have the ability to chew solid foods. Children should be seated and supervised.

Free Of
GMOs, hydrogenated oils, trans fat, artificial flavors, colors, preservatives.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 9 Cookies (20 g)
Servings per Container: About 8
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories90*
Total Fat3 g8%
   Saturated Fat0 g2%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium40 mg3%
Total Carbohydrate15 g10%
   Dietary Fiber0 g2%
   Total Sugars6 g
     INcludes 5g Added Sugars19%
Protein1 g4%
Vitamin D0 mcg0%
Calcium0 mg0%
Iron1.5 mg20%
Potassium0 mg0%
Thiamin0.2 mg30%
Riboflavin0.2 mg30%
Niacin1.7 mg30%
Vitamin B60.2 mg30%
Folate (20mcg folic acid)70 mcg DFE45%
Vitamin B120.6 mcg70%
Zinc1.1 mg35%
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Organic wheat flour, organic cane sugar, organic sunflower and/or organic safflower oil, organic oat flour, organic raisin paste, water, organic invert cane sugar, organic cinnamon, leavening (sodium bicarbonate, ammonium bicarbonate), sea salt, vitamin mineral blend (ferric orthophosphate, niacinamide, zinc oxide, cyanocobalamin, maltodextrin, folic acid, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin).
Contains: Wheat
Warnings

 

The product you receive may contain additional details or differ from what is shown on this page, or the product may have additional information revealed by partially peeling back the label. We recommend you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Give Your Child's Lunch a Healthy Makeover With This Dietitian's Tips

A new school year is almost here. But before you pack lunch for the kiddos, consider ways to make those meals more healthful.

Busy parents sometimes send their kids to school with lunches that are convenient, but not necessarily healthful. Many of these prepackaged and processed foods are loaded with sodium, added sugar and other potentially harmful ingredients.

How to Pack Lunch for School Exemplified by Healthful Foods Options with Fruit in Juice on White Wood Background | Vitacost.com/blog

Fortunately, just a little planning can boost the nutritional quality of the lunches you pack, says Juliette Britton, a Denver-based registered dietitian and author of the book “EAT! 7 Steps to Fuel Your Family Without Nagging, Bribing or Losing Your Mind.”

More healthful options - how to pack lunch for school 

A few years ago, the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity noted that many nutritionists were highly critical of Kraft Lunchables, a staple of many home-packed lunches.

These critics lamented the high levels of sodium and saturated fat in many varieties of Lunchables.

But Britton says it is relatively easy to prepare a more healthful alternative to Lunchables at home. 

“It’s really economical to buy whole grain crackers and more natural deli meats, and to slice up some cheese,” Britton says.

Fruit snacks are another lunch staple that are not as healthful as they appear.

“A natural, healthier alternative is dried fruit – dried mangoes, dried cherries,” Britton says. “They’re still sweet, but they’re not nearly as sticky in the teeth.”

Many parents also pack juices or chocolate milk with their child’s lunch. But these drinks are loaded with added sugars.

For instance, Britton notes that the American Heart Association recommends kids ingest less than 6 teaspoons – or 25 grams -- of added sugars daily. By contrast, the best type of chocolate milk still contains closer to 32  grams of sugar in 8 ounces, she says.

For this reason, Britton urges parents to stick to water or plain milk when packing school lunches. 

Getting kids on board

Of course, getting your children to buy in to more healthful eating – and to stick to that commitment throughout the school year -- can be a challenge.

One way to overcome this obstacle to get children more involved and invested in the process.

“Once kids are old enough to go to school, they should be packing their own lunches,” Britton says.

Asking kids to pack their own lunches can be particularly helpful to parents of picky eaters, Britton says.

Britton says that although some children have legitimate problems with food aversion or texture issues, many others simply want a greater say in what they eat.

“Picky eating is a phenomenon in Western culture, and it has to do with power struggles,” she says.

So, Britton suggests that starting in kindergarten, parents should allow their children to begin packing the side dishes that go with the main part of the lunch. “As they get older, they take on more responsibility,” she adds.

In addition, parents can let children to choose the fruit they want to pack, or a favorite flavor of granola or yogurt.

“Parents can choose how they’re going to spend their grocery budget, but be fair and offer options to your kids,” Britton says.

Britton also urges parents to build in flexibility when packing lunches. She recalls when her own daughter requested Goldfish crackers with lunch. Britton reluctantly agreed to add a small container of the crackers to her daughter’s lunch.

Allowing such occasional indulgences creates an atmosphere of “normalcy” around the food, rather than turning it into something like a “forbidden fruit” that children will be tempted to crave, Britton says.

“You empower kids to start making choices at a young age,” she says. “It honors their taste preferences, it honors their texture preferences.” 

Finally, remember that if you want your kids to eat more healthfully, you must set a powerful example by modeling healthful choices.

“It always comes down to ‘What are parents eating for lunch?’” Britton says. “Kids are smart. And they’ll notice that if Mom’s not packing a lunch, that means Mom’s eating her meal out.”

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