skip to main content

Garden of Life mykind Organics Turmeric Maximum Strength Joints & Mobility -- 30 Vegan Tablets


Garden of Life mykind Organics Turmeric Maximum Strength Joints & Mobility
In stock
View Similar Products
  • +

Added to My List as a guest.

Your guest list will be saved temporarily during your shopping session.

Sign in to add items to your saved list(s).

1 item added to your list

Garden of Life mykind Organics Turmeric Maximum Strength Joints & Mobility -- 30 Vegan Tablets

Oops! Something went wrong and we were unable to process your request. Please try again.

Garden of Life mykind Organics Turmeric Maximum Strength Joints & Mobility Description

  • 5x the Strength
  • Fermented Turmeric & Ginger
  • Organic Black Pepper & Probiotics for Digestion
  • USDA Organic
  • Non-GMO Project Verified
  • Gluten-Free Certified
  • Vegan Certified
  • Kosher

Turmeric root is packed with beneficial compounds especially Curcumin that work together to suppor the body's antioxidant processes. Our Maximum Strength Turmeric includes the Organic Whole Turmeric root, plus its botanical relative Organc Ginger root, fermented to support their bioavailability. We've added 5x the Strength (vs. Extra Strength) to this power-packed formula of Certified Organic Turmeric extract, delivering 500mg of Curcumin.

  • Promotes joint health & mobility
  • Contains probiotics & organic black pepper extract for enhanced digestion

Traceable Purity

Our herbals are special because we source ingredients from sustainable organic farms and use an Organic, Non-GMO extraction method without the use of conventional corn alcohol or other harsh chemicals. I'm really proud to share these with you!"

 

Enjoy! Love, Alicia

Alicia Silverstone

 

Traceable, Tested & True

3rd Party audited, Certified Organic & Non-GMO Verified

Expertly Formulated


Directions

Suggested Use: Adults take 1 tablet daily. Not intended for children.
Free Of
Gluten, GMOs, dairy, soy ingredients, peanut, tree nuts or shellfish, artificial colors or preservatives.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Tablet
Servings per Container: 30
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Organic Turmeric Blend
Organic Turmeric Root Extract standardized to 95% curcuminoids, Organic Fermented Turmeric Root (blend yielding 500mg curcuminoids)
630 mg*
Organic Fermented Ginger Root50 mg*
Organic Organic Black Pepper Fruit Extract7 mg*
Probiotic Blend Bifidobacterium lactis Bl-04
Lactobacillus acidophilus La-14
4 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Clean Tablet Technology™ Blend (patent pending): Organic gum arabic, organic dextrose, organic coating (organic sunflower lecithin, organic tapioca maltodextrin, organic palm oil, organic guar gum).

Manufactured in a facility that also processes soy, dairy, peanut, tree nuts and shellfish.

Warnings

As with any dietary supplement, consult your healthcare practitioner before using this product, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, anticipate surgery, taken medication on a regular basis or are otherwise under medical supervision.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
View printable version Print Page

Farm-to-Pill? Why Supplement Ingredients—and Where They Come From—Matters

Ever been curious about what exactly is in your vitamin supplement? And then gotten frustrated because the label doesn’t provide much information? Driven by customer demand, vitamin companies have started to become more transparent about disclosing where their supplement ingredients come from. Commonly referred to as ingredient sourcing, most people are more familiar with the concept as it pertains to food, such as farm-to-table or locally grown produce. But given the opaqueness of the supplements industry, coupled with the looser regulations supplement manufacturers have at their disposal, ingredient sourcing is perhaps even more pertinent for this sector.

Supplement Ingredients Including Orange Turmeric Powder on Spoon with Capsule and Fresh Root on Burlap Cloth | Vitacost.com/blog

Why should we care where supplements are sourced from?

The main reason to pay attention to where your supplements are sourced from is to have a better awareness of what exactly is in your supplements and what kind of ingredients it’s best to avoid. In particular, because the supplement industry is not subject to the same stringent regulations as drugs, consumers have to be extra diligent about researching and vetting the supplements they choose.

If the FDA doesn’t regulate the supplement industry, how do I know what I’m taking is safe?

In general, the best advice is to sleuth before you swallow. The FDA does regulate supplements, but they are regulated as food—not drugs—which gives manufactures much more leeway. The FDA requires that drugs be proven safe and effective but make no such demands on supplements. Although the FDA does make periodic manufacturing inspections, in general the industry functions more like an honor system, because of the FDA’s limited resources. Infractions abound. A recent ConsumerLab (a publisher of test results on health, wellness, and nutrition products) report revealed that more than half of the audited supplement manufacturers were cited by the FDA for not following basic quality control practices, such as establishing specifications for the identity, purity, and strength of the finished products and conducting ingredient tests.

What’s the difference between natural, synthetic, whole food supplements and food-based supplements?

Many people may not realize that ingredient sourcing highlights a very important distinction between vitamins—the difference between vitamins sourced from natural ingredients, such as food or herbs, and vitamins created synthetically in a lab. In response to an emerging body of research supports the premise that synthetic vitamins don’t act the same in our bodies as their natural counterparts, a growing number of consumers are actively seeking more naturally sourced ingredients. Here is a breakdown of the four major categories of ingredient sourcing for vitamins.

Natural vitamins

This category very broadly refers to vitamins sourced from ingredients found in nature.

Whole-food vitamins

Vitamin and mineral nutrients extracted from vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants that your body easily recognizes and absorbs as whole-food complexes. Though these supps might contain smaller amounts of nutrients, they’re free from fillers and binders, which can affect bioavailability (how your body recognizes and absorbs the nutrients).

Food-based vitamins

Something of a hybrid approach, food-based vitamins are made by using enzymes to compound synthetic and natural vitamins with vegetable proteins. Typically, they are a blend of natural and synthetic nutrients that feature a whole-food or herbal base. Such formulas often minimize stomach upset and enhance absorption of USP synthetic vitamins by enhancing the overall bioavailability of the supplement.

Synthetic vitamins

Created in a lab through synthetic processes, these vitamins are made from isolated nutrients derived from natural sources like soy, lanolin, sago palm, sugar beets, corn starch, or rice starch, to name a few. The manufacturing process include chemicals, solvents and heat to distill or reduce down nutrients into a particular isolated chemical structure that is called a “pure” vitamin. Even if you now know the differences between the kinds of vitamins, it can still be challenging to know what to look for when you choose a supplement. Here are five pertinent questions to consider before choosing a supplement:

Is the product independently tested?

This can help ensure that a supplement contains what it claims, in the dose listed on the label, without impurities. A seal is another easy way to confirm purity, but products without seals are not necessarily inferior.

Does the manufacturer have a good reputation for quality control, research and customer service?

You can educate yourself on this front by reading independent reviews, looking for a seal of certification, or getting specific recommendations from your healthcare practitioner. At the very least, you can check a company’s website and see what they have to say about their ingredient sourcing and quality control practices.

Is the product backed by clinical research?

This one is especially relevant if you are taking a product for a specific health reason, rather than as a more generalized way to support overall health. If a product does have research backing its efficacy, you should be able to find it easily on the company’s website.

Are there any unnecessary additives in the ingredients list, such as sugar, lactose, dyes, or flavors?

A few supplement additives are unavoidable, but in general the shorter the list of ingredients the better. Some red flags to look out for are artificial sweeteners or dyes, both of which are unnecessary.

Does the product display its ingredients and sourcing?

One surefire way to make sure your supplement components have been sourced from quality ingredients is to simply look for the words “ingredients” and “sourcing” on the label. If a manufacturer puts those words together on a bottle, chances are they are proud to disclose the ingredients inside. If, on the other hand, the ingredients are of questionable quality, chances are the manufacturer will opt to conveniently omit that information from the bottle.
Sponsored Link
Sign Up & Save

Get exclusive offers, free shipping deals, expert health tips & more by signing up for our promotional emails.

Please enter a valid zip code
FLDC11
183287