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Garden of Life Vitamin Code® RAW K-Complex™ -- 60 Vegan Capsules


Garden of Life Vitamin Code® RAW K-Complex™
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Garden of Life Vitamin Code® RAW K-Complex™ -- 60 Vegan Capsules

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Garden of Life Vitamin Code® RAW K-Complex™ Description

  • Whole Food
  • K-Complex
  • 100mcg Vitamin K2 as MK-7
  • Omega-Rich Lipid Delivery System
  • Kosher • Vegan
  • Gluten Free
  • Non-GMO
  • Raw

Vitamin Code® Raw K-Complex™

is whole food nutrition, specifically formulated to deliver 120mcg of whole food K-Complex, featuring Vitamin K2 as MK-7, along with Vitamins K1 and K2 as MK-4.

 

23 powered organically grown fruits and vegetables plus 75 alkalizing trace minerals add supporting antioxidants, vitamins and nutrient cofactors.

• Bone Strength

• Healthy Blood Clotting and Coagulation

• Healthy Heart

• Live Probiotics Support Healthy Digestion

 

What Raw Means

No high heat, synthetic binders, fillers, artificial flavors, sweeteners, colors or additives commonly used in tablets.

Non-GMO Verified

Independent, third party verification.

Whole Food

RAW Food-Created Nutrients™ are blended in a base of organically grown fruits and vegetables together with food cofactors.

 


Directions

Adults take 1 capsule daily. Best taken with food. Not intended for children.
Free Of
Gluten, GMOs, high heat, synthetic binders, fillers, artificial flavors, sweeteners, colors, additives commonly used in tablets.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Capsule
Servings per Container: 60
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Vitamin K [K2 (MK-7, MK-4) and K1]120 mcg150%
Cole Pressed Omega Rich Flax Seed Oil300 mg*
RAW Organic Fruit & Veggie Mineral Blend
Organic Apple (fruit), Organic Beet (root), Organic Broccoli (stalk & flower), Organic Carrot (root), Organic Spinach (leaf), Organic Tomato (fruit), Organic Green Bell Pepper (fruit), Organic Brussels Sprout (leaf), Organic Ginger (root), Organic Garlic (bulb), Organic Green Onion (bulb), Organic Parsley (leaf), Organic Cauliflower (flower & stem), Organic Red Cabbage (leaf), Organic Kale (leaf), Organic Cucumber (gourd), Organic Celery (stalk), Organic Asparagus (flower & stem)
130 mg*
Trace Mineral Blend
RAW Organic Spirulina, RAW Cracked-Wall Chlorella, Ancient Peat (Trace Minerals)
65 mg*
RAW Probiotic Blend
[Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus bulgaricus] (500 Million CFU)
5 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Vegetable cellulose (capsule), organic rice (hull).
Warnings

As with any dietary supplement, consult your healthcare practitioner before using this product, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, anticipate surgery, take medication (particularly blood thinners) on a regular basis or are otherwise under medical supervision.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Are You a "Junk Food Vegetarian"? Shape Up With These Tips

Astonishingly, just 5 percent of Americans identify as vegetarians and just 3 percent as vegans. However, this small minority of the population may very well be much healthier than the majority of Americans.

How so? The American Dietetic Association says that “appropriately planned” vegetarian and vegan diets are “nutritionally adequate” and might offer myriad benefits in warding off or treating various diseases.

“Vegan and vegetarian diets are phenomenal for your health, the animals and the environment,” says Scott Burgett, founder of plantbasedscotty.com, a vegan recipe and wellness website.

Woman Who Isn't Following a Healthy Vegetarian Diet Savoring a Slice of Pizza With Eyes Closed at Table | Vitacost.com/blog

While those advantages are worthy of praise, a vegetarian or vegan still must follow an “appropriately planned” diet. An inappropriately planned vegetarian or vegan diet can lack certain vital nutrients or even can be laden with fat and sugar.

So, if you’re a vegetarian or vegan, how do you ensure you’re adhering to a proper diet? Experts serve up these four tips.

1. Stick to whole, unprocessed foods.

This perhaps is the most important pointer for vegetarians and vegans.

Burgett says that as long as you derive most of your calories from whole, unprocessed foods, you shouldn’t have any major dietary concerns. These foods include fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, whole greens, beans/legumes, nuts and seeds.

“For your health, it’s incredibly important to eat foods in their whole form so that you can reap all the benefits the [vegetarian and vegan] diets have to offer,” Burgett says.

2. Boost your B12 intake.

A common nutritional deficiency among vegetarians and vegans is vitamin B12. Burgett says that’s because B12 is naturally found only in animal foods, which vegans and some vegetarians don’t eat.

A study published in 2003 in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that among people who didn’t take vitamins, 92 percent of vegans and 77 percent of vegetarians lacked sufficient amounts of B12, compared with 11 percent of meat eaters.

However, a once-a-week, 2,500-milligram B12 supplement should be enough for vegetarians and vegans to maintain normal levels of the vitamin, Burgett says.

“These supplements are cheap, easy to ingest and safe. All vegans, along with vegetarians who don’t eat meat or fish, should supplement [with B12] as a standard, not an option,” he says.

Registered dietitian Maria Zamarripa recommends staying away from ready-to-eat breakfast cereals fortified with B12, as many of them are chock-full of sugar.

“Instead, choose fortified and unsweetened plant-based milks, nutritional yeast or a B12 supplement to help meet these vitamin needs,” Zamarripa says.

3. Bump up the fatty acids.

For vegetarians and especially for vegans, ensuring adequate consumption of two healthy omega-3 fatty acids in particular — EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docohexaenoic acid) — is critical, since they’re mostly found in fish or fish oil.

As a safe, effective alternative, Burgett recommends microalgae.

“Fish are touted as omega-3 champions, but they have to get it from somewhere, and that somewhere is microalgae,” he says. “By skipping a step and going straight to the source, vegans and vegetarians can take a low-cost omega-3 microalgae supplement.

to get what they need.”

Another beneficial omega-3 fatty acid that vegetarians and vegans should pay attention to is ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). ALA can be added to the diet through consumption of various nuts and seeds, including walnuts and flaxseed, Burgett says. Eating ALA-rich nuts and seeds also helps convert EPA and DHA in your body.

4. Don’t go overboard.

Burgett cautions that veganism don’t automatically translate into a “healthy” diet.

“Consumers seem to assume that the vegan label is a free pass to indulge until their stomachs hurt because they think it’s good for them. That couldn't be further from the truth,” he says.

Oftentimes, vegan foods like snack chips, cookies and nutrition bars are packed with fat and sugar, making them just as harmful as non-vegan “junk food,” Burgett says. Even highly processed “mock” meats and cheeses can be loaded with fat. Therefore, if you’re doubtful about the nutritional value of vegan “junk food,” opt for whole, unprocessed foods, he suggests.

Registered dietitian nutritionist Taylor Wolfram, who specializes in vegan diets, offers a different take on vegan “junk food.” While whole foods are nutrient-filled and tasty, it’s fine to eat “fun foods” like vegan-friendly pizza, cake, cookies, pies and pastries, she says.

“The risk of overeating these foods is greater when we’re restricting or dieting. When we allow ourselves to eat what feels good, we naturally strike a balance between nutrient-dense foods and pleasure foods,” she says.

Wolfram adds that since vegans must be super-vigilant about making sure they’re consuming certain nutrients, they should work with a dietitian to map out a dietary strategy.

“I see disordered eating a lot in this community,” she says, “as people become hyper-focused on nutrients and health.”

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