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New Chapter Perfect Prenatal™ Whole-Food Multivitamin -- 192 Vegetarian Tablets


New Chapter Perfect Prenatal™ Whole-Food Multivitamin

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New Chapter Perfect Prenatal™ Whole-Food Multivitamin -- 192 Vegetarian Tablets

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New Chapter Perfect Prenatal™ Whole-Food Multivitamin Description

  • Formulated for Absorption
  • Nutrition Crafted For:
    • Healthy Baby & Mom, Reduced Nausea
  • The Magic Inside:
    • Gentle & Nourishing Essential Nutrients Your Body Can Recognize, Fermented & Blended with Organic Superfoods Including Tummy-Soothing Ginger
  • ICS - Made with Organic Vegetables & Herbs
  • Non-GMO Project Verified
  • Certified Gluten Free
  • Kosher

Complete Multivitamin

 

For the Needs of Moms-To-Be

Supports development of healthy baby with key nutrients for wellness & immune support during pregnancy.

 

Healthy Baby

Includes Methylfolate—the most active form of Folate—for healthy brain and spinal cord development, and fermented Vitamin D3 for healthy development of bones and teeth.

 

Gentle Iron

Fermented Iron helps transport oxygen to your growing baby, and supports your body's increased need for Iron during pregnancy. Fermentation makes this Iron non-constipating and easy to digest.

 

Eases Morning Sickness

Soothe nausea in pregnancy (morning sickness) with a clinical dose of organic Ginger.

 

Absorb the Good Stuff

We fine-tune the levels of each high-quality vitamin & mineral, choose types that work best with the body, and ferment key nutrients with probiotics and whole foods.


Directions

Suggested Use: Three tablets. For best results, take throughout the day. Can be taken on an empty stomach. Not recommended for use in children.

Free Of
Gluten and GMOs.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 3 Tablets
Servings per Container: 64
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
%DV for adults
Vitamin A (100% as beta-carotene from ferment media)1300 mcg144%
Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid from ferment media)75 mg83%
Vitamin D3 (as cholecaciferol from ferment media)25 mcg (1000 IU)125%
Vitamin E (as d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate from ferment media)20.9 mg139%
Vitamin K (as phylloquinone [K1] from ferment media and as menaquinone-7 [k2] from natto)90 mcg73%
Thiamin (as thiamin hydrochloride from ferment media)1.4 mg117%
Riboflavin (from ferment media)1.6 mg123%
Niacin (as niacinamide from ferment media)18 mg113%
Vitamin B6 (as pyridoxine hydrochloride from ferment media)5 mg294%
Folate (as methofolate, and as 105 mcg folic acid from ferment media)600 mcg DFE150%
Vitamin B12 (as cyanocoblamin from ferment media)3 mcg125%
Biotin (from ferment media)35 mcg117%
Pantothenic Acid (as calcium D-pantothenate from ferment media)7 mg140%
Calcium from algae Lithothamnion [Lithothamnion calcareum and Lithothamnion corallioides])75 mg6%
Iron (as ferrous fumarate from ferment media)27 mg150%
Iodine (as potasium iodide from ferment media)150 mcg100%
Magnesium (as magnesium oxide from ferment media and algae Lithothamnion [Lithothamnion calcareum and Lithothamnion corallioides])15 mg4%
Zinc (as zinc oxide from ferment media)6.5 mg59%
Selenium (as selenium dioxide from ferment media)70 mcg127%
Copper (as copper sulfate anhydrous from ferment media)0.65 mcg72%
Manganese (as manganese chloride from ferment media)2.6 mg113%
Chromium (as chromium chloride from ferment media)45 mcg129%
Molybdenum (as sodium molybdate from ferment media)20 mcg44%
Prenatal Herbal Blend(from ferment media)
Organic Brown Rice, Organic Oats, Organic Prune (fruit), Organic Blueberry (fruit), Organic Blackberry (fruit), Organic Flame Raisin (fruit), Organic Raspberry (fruit), Organic Dandelion (leaf), Organic Rose Hip (fruit), Organic Lavender (flower), Organic Lemon Balm (leaf), Organic Peppermint (leaf), Organic Clove (bud)
225 mg*
Breast Support Blend
Organic Broccoli (sprout), Organic Cauliflower (sprout), Organic Kale (sprout), Organic Daikon Radish (sprout), Organic Cabbage (sprout), Organic Mustard (sprout)
100 mg*
Ginger Ginger (rhizome) 50 mg aqueous extract and 12 mg organic supercritical extract62 mg*
Organic Turmeric (rhizome) from ferment media38.2 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Ferment media (organic soy flour, organic Saccharomyces cerevisiae, organic orange peel powder, organic carrot powder, papain [deactivated], bromelain [deactivated], lactic acid bacteria [Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus], organic alfalfa powder and prenatal probiotic combination [Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus salivarius, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium breve]), organic gum acacia, silica, magnesium stearate, lac resin and carnauba wax.

Contains: Fermented soy.

Warnings

Caution: As with any dietary supplement, you should advise your healthcare professional of the use of this product if you have a medical condition or are taking medication. If you are nursing, pregnant, or considering pregnancy, consult your healthcare professional prior to using this product. Discontinue use and contact your healthcare professional if you experience a side effect or an allergic reaction.

 

Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. Keep this product out of reach of children. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Folate vs. Folic Acid: What's the Difference?

From citamin D and vitamin E to antioxidants and amino acids, it can feel impossible keeping track of what our bodies need to function brilliantly—and to know the difference among our most important nutrients.

Case in point: Folic acid and folate. Often used interchangeably—even among medical professionals—these two different forms of water-soluble vitamin B9 (yes, another nutrient to remember!) have distinctly different impacts on your health. Here’s the difference between them—and why it’s crucial to know how they vary.

Wooden Spoon Filled With Folic Acid Capsules Beside Open Supplement Bottle | Vitacost.com/blog

Folate

Eggs, oranges, garbanzo beans, leafy greens, avocados—these foods have more in common than just deliciousness: They all contain folate. Formerly known as folacin (to confuse things further), folate plays a vital role in DNA formation, reproductive health for both males and females (sperm and egg production, respectively), the growth and health of fetuses, and immune and nerve functions. What’s more, research reveals that individuals who eat diets high in folate—consider yourself blessed if you’re a fan of beets—may be naturally supporting their cognitive and cardiac health.

Folic acid

Folic acid, on the other hand, is the synthesized version of folate. It started appearing in foods in 1998 when the FDA began requiring that grains be enriched with additional nutrients. Breads, breakfast cereals, pastas, and more were specifically supplemented with folic acid in part as a response to hinder the growing rate of Neural Tube Defects in expecting mothers. (Indeed, some argue that folate is the single most important nutrient for pregnant women, and folic acid is one the leading ingredients of prenatal vitamins.) And while the push to increase folate in pregnant women’s diets has certainly been a boon across the board—reducing birth defects by up to 26%—folic acid is managed differently by the body than its derivative.

How the body handles folate and folic acid differently

Organic folates—those found in, say, black eyed peas and broccoli—are metabolized in the small intestine. Folic acid, meanwhile, is handled by the liver—a process that requires an enzyme called dihydrofolate reductase. Due to the low activity of this enzyme, however, unmetabolized folic acid may accumulate in the body.

What does this mean—and how might it impact you? Given that the standard American diet includes large amounts of processed foods fortified with folic acid—from energy bars to cold cereal and white rice—it’s possible to consume an overabundance of folate’s synthesized form.

Look at it this way: A women should get 400 mg of folate a day, but some cereals, as NBC reports, contain more than that required daily allowance through folic acid (and many inadvertently—or just because they’re plain hungry—eat more than one serving size). Couple that with a vitamin-enhanced water and you may be getting a huge dose before your folic acid-fortified lunch sandwich is served (hello, bread). And all that extra folic acid coursing through your bloodstream may lead to health issues—so much so countries, such as New Zealand, have delayed or halted the “mandatory” fortification of grain products.

Nutrition versus fortification—and how to stay safe

Whole foods—and not the trendy market—are, inarguably, the wisest way to improve (or sustain) your overall health, and most medical professionals would advocate reaching for nutrient-dense foods rather than relying on synthetic counterparts or fortified items. With that in mind, to bolster your intake of folate, fill your plate with asparagus, spinach, liver (try it with caramelized onions) and Brussels sprouts, which the National Institutes of Health reports are the foods highest in folate.

Other top options include green peas, wheat germ, tomato juice, citrus fruits, mustard greens, Dungeness crab, and peanuts. Additionally, examine labels (particularly when it comes to cereals and energy drinks) and elect whole grain flour, rice, and bread products, which don’t mandate fortification with folic acid. In other words, eat whole to be whole.

These statements have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease.

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