skip to main content

NOW Livingnow™ Organic Amaranth Whole Grain -- 16 oz


NOW Livingnow™ Organic Amaranth Whole Grain
In stock
View Similar Products
  • +

Added to My List as a guest.

Your guest list will be saved temporarily during your shopping session.

Sign in to add items to your saved list(s).

1 item added to your list

NOW Livingnow™ Organic Amaranth Whole Grain -- 16 oz

Oops! Something went wrong and we were unable to process your request. Please try again.

NOW Livingnow™ Organic Amaranth Whole Grain Description

  • Organic Ancient Grain with a Sweet and Nutty Flavor
  • Good Source of Protein and Fiber
  • Produced in a Dedicated Gluten- Free, Allergy-Friendly Facility
  • Always Made Without: Dairy • Wheat • Soy • Nuts • Eggs
  • Non GMO Project Verified
  • USDA Organic
  • Certified Gluten-Free
  • Kosher

There are grains, and then there's Amaranth. Along with buckwheat and quinoa, Amaranth is one of the few plant sources to offer a complete set of amino acids, making it a rare plant source of complete protein. It's naturally gluten-free and a good source of protein and fiber.

 

Living Now™ Organic Amaranth is perfect for making gluten-free pasta, but should be combined with other grains/flours for baked goods since it has gluten and will not rise on its own. Amaranth has a mild flavor that's both sweet and nutty, and it's popular addition to many vegetarian recipes.

 

Living Now is more than just a brand of great-tasting gluten-free foods - it's a way of life for anyone with food sensitivities. This premium line was developed to provide wholesome, healthy foods bursting with flavor and made without gluten and major common allergens including wheat, nuts, soy, dairy, eggs, and shellfish. Living Now is produced in a dedicated, allergy-friendly facility, colors or preservatives. With Living Now eating is safe, fun and satisfying again!


Directions

Basic Cooking Instructions:

1 cup of Living Now Organic Amaranth

2 1/2 cups of water

 

1. Combine Amaranth and water into a pot.

2. Bring to a boil then cover with tight fitting lid.

3. Reduce heat to low and allow Amaranth to simmer for 20 minutes or until grains are fluffy and water absorbs.

**Tip: if you would like to turn this mixture into an amaranth porridge add another 1/2 cup of water and cook for an additional 7-10 minutes.

Free Of
Dairy, wheat, soy, nuts eggs, peanuts, gluten and GMOs

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: About 1/4 Cup (47 g)
Servings per Container: About 10
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories180
Calories from Fat30
Total Fat3 g5%
   Saturated Fat1 g5%
   Trans Fat0
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium10 mg<1%
Total Carbohydrate31 g10%
   Dietary Fiber7 g28%
   Sugars1 g
Protein7 g14%
Vitamin A0%
Vitamin C4%
Calcium8%
Iron20%
Other Ingredients: Organic whole grain amaranth (non-GMO).
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
View printable version Print Page

Are Plant-Based Diets Actually Harmful to Heart Health?

This headline for an article posted on the website of the American College of Cardiology might seem alarming: “Some Plant-Based Diets May Increase Heart Disease Risk.” However, for many people who follow plant-based diets, there’s no reason to be alarmed.

The headline refers to a study published in mid-July in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that raised the specter of some plant-based diets actually elevating your risk for heart disease.

Plant-Based Diet Fruits and Vegetables Arranged to Create Question Mark | Vitacost.com/blog

The study showed that a healthier plant-based diet — featuring whole grains, fruits, vegetables and the like — was tied to a lower risk of heart disease. But the study also showed that a plant-based diet emphasizing not-so-healthy plant foods like sweetened beverages, refined grains, potatoes and sweets was associated with a higher risk for heart disease.

“It’s apparent that there is a wide variation in the nutritional quality of plant foods, making it crucial to take into consideration the quality of foods in a plant-based diet,” Ambika Satija, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and lead author of the study, says in a news release.

It’s worth noting, as the Lifehacker website did, that the study scored people who ate both meat and plants, and how close they were to consuming a “healthy” or “unhealthy” plant-based diet.

“The study also didn’t distinguish between healthy and unhealthy animal products: fish, yogurt and bacon grease would all lower your scores equally,” Lifehacker says.

So, how should you react to the study’s findings?

Richard VanVranken, an agricultural agent with Rutgers Cooperative Extension in Atlantic County, New Jersey, has eaten a mostly plant-based diet for over 35 years. He says true vegetarians shouldn’t be concerned about the results of the study. Instead, it should be those people who’ve reduced or eliminated consumption of meat but continue to chow down on fried, refined and overly sweet foods.

“The study supports previous work that has shown an overall plant-based diet reduces heart disease risk, but adds to it that a defined, healthy plant-based diet reduces that risk even more,” VanVranken says.

“Unfortunately,” he adds, “there are plant-based diets that can still include a lot of foods that are not good for heart health, and that is the even greater revelation of this study. Someone who thinks they’re eating healthier by just cutting out meat without cutting back on sweetened beverages, refined grains and sweets may actually be increasing their risk for heart disease.”

In a Journal of the American College of Cardiology editorial accompanying the study, Dr. Kim Allan Williams, chair of the division of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, wrote that plant-based diets featuring whole grains, unsaturated fats and an abundance of fruits and vegetables “deserve more emphasis in dietary recommendations.” Williams, who switched to a vegan diet in 2003, is former president of the American College of Cardiology.

In other words, if you’re a vegetarian or vegan who sticks to a diet that’s free of the bad stuff but full of the good stuff, you’re on the right track in protecting your heart health.

Despite that reality, VanVranken says he’s afraid that headlines about the study might prompt “fad-following vegetarians” to ditch plant-based diets or “anti-vegetarian folks” to use those headlines as a weapon.

“Conversely, what really needs to be done is to correctly point out the differences between a ‘healthy’ plant-based diet and an ‘unhealthy’ plant-based diet to make sure those fad followers,” he says, “and even those who have good intentions but are poorly educated about vegetarian diets understand that simply dropping meat from your meals is not necessarily a healthy choice. This study puts legitimate research findings behind that argument and defines that healthy plant-based diet.”

Certified health coach and nutritional consultant Jared Koch says he wasn’t surprised by the study’s findings, since eating more nutrient-dense, plant-based foods — like fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts — “is the single best thing you can do to improve your diet and health.”

“Whether you should be eating animal foods or not is ultimately determined by what your individual body needs,” Koch says. “If you do eat them, choose high-quality versions as much as possible, such as organic and grass-fed. Either way, eat a lot of vegetables and reduce your intake of sugar and chemical-laden junk foods.”

Along those lines, the American College of Cardiology recently issued recommendations urging hospitals to improve patient menus by adding healthy plant-based options and removing processed meats. That followed passage of a resolution by the American Medical Association calling on hospitals to offer healthy plant-based meals and cut processed meats from patient menus.

“Too many heart disease patients have had their recovery undermined by bacon and hot dogs on their hospital trays,” Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, says in a news release. “Hospitals that ban processed meats and promote plant-based meals will do a better job at helping patients’ hearts heal.”

Sponsored Link
Sign Up & Save

Get exclusive offers, free shipping deals, expert health tips & more by signing up for our promotional emails.

Please enter a valid zip code
FLDC18
120263