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Purely Elizabeth Probiotic Granola Gluten Free Chocolate Sea Salt -- 8 oz


Purely Elizabeth Probiotic Granola Gluten Free Chocolate Sea Salt
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Purely Elizabeth Probiotic Granola Gluten Free Chocolate Sea Salt -- 8 oz

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Purely Elizabeth Probiotic Granola Gluten Free Chocolate Sea Salt Description

  • Made with Organic Quinoa, Millet + Chia
  • Baked with Coconut Oil
  • Sweetened with Coconut Sugar
  • Supports Digestive + Immune Health
  • Certified Vegan • Non GMO Project Verified • Certified Gluten Free
  • 130 Calories [per 30 g serving]
  • Contains Probiotic Cultures (Bacillus coagulans GBI-30 6086)

Gluten-Free Just Got An Upgrade. Fair trade chocolate chunks + coarse sea salt combine with ancient grains dusted in cacao powder for a purely crunchy, salty-sweet + chocolaty taste. Who says healthy foods can't be insanely delicious? Our intestines are filled with both good bacteria and bad bacteria. The key to intestinal health is a balance of both. Probiotics are the good bacteria your gut needs. With 70% of our immune system located in our gut, it's crucial to keep the gut healthy and happy for optimal wellness! As part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle, eating two servings a day of pure granola will get you the maximum probiotic benefits to help support a healthy immune and digestive system.

  • Made with Organic Quinoa, Millet + Chia
  • Baked with Coconut Oil
  • Sweetened with Coconut Sugar
  • Supports Digestive + Immune Health
  • Certified Vegan
  • Non GMO Project Verified
  • Certified Gluten Free
  • 130 Calories [per 30 g serving]


Directions

Best Enjoyed:

with yogurt

with milk

on top of a smoothie

sprinkled over a salad

in a trail mix

crumbled over ice cream

baked into a crisp

or plain jane - by itself

Free Of
Gluten, GMO and animal ingredients.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1/3 cup (30 g)
Servings per Container: About 8
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories130
Calories from Fat45
Total Fat5 g8%
   Saturated Fat3 g15%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium120 mg5%
Total Carbohydrate17 g6%
   Dietary Fiber2 g8%
   Sugars6 g
Protein3 g
Vitamin A0%
Vitamin C2%
Calcium2%
Iron6%
Other Ingredients: Organic gluten-free oats, organic coconut palm sugar, organic raw virgin coconut oil, organic fair trade dark chocolate chunks (organic cane sugar, organic chocolate liquor, organic cocoa butter, organic vanilla extract), sunflower seeds, organic puffed amaranth, cacao powder, organic quinoa flakes, organic millet flakes, organic chia seeds, cinnamon, sea salt, probiotic cultures (organic inulin, palm oil, bacillus coagulans GBI-30 6086).
Contains: Coconut. May contain walnuts, cashews and almonds.
Made in a facility that also processes soy, milk, egg, peanuts and other tree nuts.
The product you receive may contain additional details or differ from what is shown on this page, or the product may have additional information revealed by partially peeling back the label. We recommend you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
View printable version Print Page

Avoid These Breakfast Foods for Better Morning Meals

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But the wrong choices can get the morning off to a bad start, and put your health at risk.

Many traditional breakfast foods – including some of the most appealing – offer little nutrition and actually can contribute to diabetes, heart disease and other health issues.

Following are five popular foods that make for a lousy breakfast.

Mother and Child Sharing Bowl of Healthy Breakfast Food in Kitchen | Vitacost.com/blog

Processed meats such as sausages, bacon and salami

These breakfast staples have several strikes against them, according to Kim Larson, a Seattle-based registered dietitian nutritionist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

"Highly processed foods have only half the amount of protein as other protein foods, and contribute lots of salt to our diet," she says.

They also are high in saturated fat, which raises levels of LDL cholesterol – the so-called "bad" cholesterol – and puts you at greater risk of heart disease.

"Eating these foods regularly has been found to be linked to an 18 percent increased risk of colon cancer," Larson says.

Bagels

Bagels sure look healthy, but appearances can be deceiving. Aside from 100 percent whole-grain options, bagels typically are "300-500 calories worth of starch," according to the Cleveland Clinic.

Add in cream cheese or butter, and you have an unhealthy breakfast food that increases your risk of heart disease, and that the Cleveland Clinic describes as "an invitation for diabetes."

Doughnuts

You might love having a glazed doughnut in the morning, but your body does not, says Judy Caplan, a Vienna, Virginia-based registered dietitian nutritionist and founder of the GoBeFull program and website.

"Doughnuts are usually made from white bleached flour, which is devoid of fiber and then exposed to powerful bleaching agents," she says.

They also are full of refined sugar and inflammatory fats. The refined sugar in the doughnut -- coupled with the natural sugars in the flour and the lack of fiber -- break down quickly, causing an insulin response, Caplan says.

Refined oils used to fry doughnuts are repeatedly exposed to high temperatures that denature the oils and change the chemical bonds, Caplan says. "These oils can be inflammatory and dangerous to arteries, especially if they are hydrogenated or trans fats," she says.

A typical glazed donut has about 255 calories, which is not a lot, according to Caplan. "But those calories have few nutrients and no fiber, which make them empty calories," she says.

Breakfast cereals

That bowl of Frosted Flakes or Froot Loops might bring back warm childhood memories. But the cold, hard truth is that such cereals contain far more sugar than is good for you.

About 92 percent of cold cereals in the U.S. are preloaded with added sugars, according to a 2014 study by the Environmental Working Group.

Breakfast cereals can still be a healthful choice if you select your cereal wisely, according to the Mayo Clinic. It suggests looking for cereals that:

  • Have at least 3 grams of fiber a serving, and preferably 5 or more
  • Have less than 160 calories a serving if you are on a diet
  • Do not list sugar among the first few ingredients

Pancakes and waffles with syrup

These tasty breakfast treats don't offer much nutrition. In fact, they essentially are "refined carbohydrates with more liquid sugar dumped on top," Larson says.

Such refined carbohydrates are the biggest contributors to added sugars in the American diet, Larson says. They provide a quick energy boost, but then drop your blood sugar even lower than before you ate them.

"They give us energy for just a short time and are nutritionally empty of nutrients for good health," Larson says. "After eating them, 30 to 60 minutes later we are hungry and need to eat again."

What you should eat instead

Larson says that to boost your metabolic rate and give your brain and muscles the energy and nutrition they need to start the day, breakfast foods should include:

"Protein foods and whole-grain fibers give us long-lasting energy that can fuel us throughout the day," Larson says.

Caplan also suggests that you don't have to give up your favorite breakfast foods. Instead, you can modify them so they are more healthful.

For example, instead of buying doughnuts, make your own muffins that are naturally sweet and contain fiber and nutrients.

"Almond butter pumpkin muffins are one of my favs," she says. "There are many gluten-free options, too, using almond flour, coconut flour, bran, dates."

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