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Kroger Women's Gummie Natural Berry -- 150 Gummies


Kroger Women's Gummie Natural Berry
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Kroger Women's Gummie Natural Berry -- 150 Gummies

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Kroger Women's Gummie Natural Berry Description

  • Natural Berry Flavors
  • Complete Multivitamin
  • Dietary Supplement


Directions

Suggested Use: As a dietary supplement, take two (2) gummy vitamins per day. Chew thoroughly before swallowing. Take only as directed. Do not exceed suggested dosage.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 2 Gummies
Servings per Container: 75
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories15
Total Carbohydrate3 g1%
   Sugars2 g
Vitamin A (as retinyl palmitate)2500 IU50%
Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid)30 mg50%
Vitamin D (as cholecalciferol)800 IU200%
Vitamin E (as di-alpha-tocopheryl acetate)30 IU100%
Niacin (as inositol niacinate)20 mg100%
Vitamin B6 (as pyridoxine HCI)2 mg100%
Folic Acid400 mcg100%
Vitamin B12 (as cyanocobalamin)18 mcg300%
Biotin400 mcg133%
Pantothenic Acid (as calcium d-pantothenate)10 mg100%
Calcium (as tricalcium phosphate)100 mg10%
Phosphorus (as tricalcium phosphate)50 mg5%
Iodine (as potassium iodide)38 mcg25%
Chromium (as chromium picolinate)120 mcg100%
Choline (as choline bitartrate)40 mcg
Inositol (as inositol niacinate)8 mg
Boron (as boron citrate)150 mcg
Other Ingredients: Glucose syrup, sucrose, water, gelatin; less than 2% of: citric acid, colors (blueberry and carrot concentrates, lycopene, purple carrot juice concentrate), fractionated coconut oil (contains beeswax and/or carnauba wax), lactic acid, natural flavors.
Processed in a facility with products that contain egg, fish, shellfish, soy and tree nuts.
Warnings

If you have a medical condition, are on medication or are pregnant or nursing, please seek the advice of a qualified health care professional before using. This product may settle during shipping. Do not expose to excessive heat or moisture. Colors will fade over time. This does not alter the potency of the product.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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What Happens if You Don't Get Enough Vitamin D?

Vitamin D comes from a readily available source — the sun. Yet about 1 billion people around the world suffer from vitamin D deficiency. One estimate indicates deficiency of the so-called “sunshine vitamin” afflicts more than 34 million Americans.

Woman Affected by Vitamin D Deficiency Holding Shoulders in Pain on Couch With Laptop | Vitacost.com/blog

A study published in 2012 in the Journal of Pharmacology & Pharmacotherapeutics underscores that the “pandemic” of vitamin D deficiency stems primarily from lifestyle and environmental factors that reduce exposure to sunlight. Sunlight is required for UVB-induced production of vitamin D in the skin.

Which health problems are tied to vitamin D deficiency?

So, what are the possible health consequences of vitamin D deficiency? The Cleveland Clinic and the Mayo Clinic say a lack of vitamin D is associated with:

  • Chronic pain
  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Immune system disorders
  • Infections
  • Osteoporosis
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Some types of cancer, such as breast, colon and prostate
  • Type 2 diabetes

The Mayo Clinic points out that “an association does not mean low vitamin D causes these conditions, or that taking a vitamin D supplement will adequately prevent or treat them.”

Keep in mind that no clinical studies have shown that vitamin D is effective in treating or preventing COVID-19, the potentially deadly disease caused by the novel coronavirus. In fact, a report published in the journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health cautions that taking mega-doses of vitamin D in an attempt to ward off COVID-19 can be harmful.

“It is absolutely essential that advice given to the public is evidence-based, accurate and timely; anything less would mislead and has the potential to cause harm,” the report says. “Popular information channels, such as social media platforms, have been rife with misinformation that has been perpetuated by fear and uncertainty. This has been the case particularly for diet and lifestyle advice.”

What is vitamin D deficiency?

Simply put, vitamin D deficiency means you’re not getting enough of this vitamin to stay healthy, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. One of the key benefits of vitamin D is it helps absorb calcium, which strengthens bones and teeth. It also helps maintain your immune, muscle and nervous systems, the National Library of Medicine says.

According to Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, those susceptible to vitamin D deficiency include people with eating disorders, people who’ve undergone gastric bypass procedures, pregnant and lactating women, dark-skinned people and people who regularly cover their skin when they’re outdoors.

How to get the right amount of vitamin D

If you’re seeking to legitimately enhance your health, how do you ensure you’re getting enough vitamin D? The Cleveland Clinic outlines three ways:

When it comes to food, the Cleveland Clinic explains that vitamin D doesn’t occur naturally in most foods. But some foods are natural sources, including:

Some foods also are fortified with vitamin D:

For most Americans, fortified foods represent the primary source of vitamin D.

Nutritional supplements also can boost your vitamin D intake.

As outlined by the National Library of Medicine, here are the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) of vitamin D, expressed in international units (IU):

  • Infants up to 12 months old — 400 IU
  • Children 1 to 13 years old — 600 IU
  • Teens 14 to 18 years old — 600 IU
  • Adults 19 to 70 years old — 600 IU
  • Adults age 71 years and above — 800 IU
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women — 600 IU

These recommendations cover food, multivitamins and vitamin D-only supplements. The Mayo Clinic notes that 1,000 to 2,000 IU per day of vitamin D from supplements is generally safe for adults.

The danger of vitamin D toxicity

Vitamin D can be too much of a good thing, though. The National Library of Medicine warns that excess vitamin D (known as vitamin D toxicity) can cause nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, constipation, weakness, weight loss, kidney damage and high levels of blood calcium.

“Most cases of vitamin D toxicity happen when someone overuses vitamin D supplements,” the National Library of Medicine says. “Excessive sun exposure doesn’t cause vitamin D poisoning because the body limits the amount of this vitamin it produces.”

According to the T.H. Chan School of Public Health, it’s unclear whether taking amounts of vitamin D beyond recommended daily amounts is beneficial in disease prevention.

“Although observational studies see a strong connection with lower rates of certain diseases in populations that live in sunnier climates or have higher serum levels of vitamin D, clinical trials that give people vitamin D supplements to affect a particular disease are still inconclusive,” the T.H. Chan School of Public Health says.

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