skip to main content

Liddell Homeopathic Stomach Distress -- 1 fl oz


Liddell Homeopathic Stomach Distress
  • Our price: $10.59

  • +

Added to My List as a guest.

Your guest list will be saved temporarily during your shopping session.

Sign in to add items to your saved list(s).

1 item added to your list

Liddell Homeopathic Stomach Distress -- 1 fl oz

Oops! Something went wrong and we were unable to process your request. Please try again.

Liddell Homeopathic Stomach Distress Description

This great product works Amazingly Fast for many causes of upset stomach, including food poisoning. Relieve symptoms associated with gastric distress, such as:

• Nausea
• Indigestion
• Stomach cramps
• Flatulance

Fast relief for stomach distress! Keep this easy-to-use spray bottle handy in the medicine cabinet or your travel case. You'll want this day-saving product nearby when the need arises. Stomach Distress is the safe, natural way to relieve the misery of upset stomach, nausea, bloating or stomach cramping. This convenient oral spray makes it easy to get the safe and natural relief you need within minutes!

• Non-Drowsy, with No Drug Interactions.
• Safe for the elderly and high risk patients.
• Safe for use with prescription medication, dietary supplementsand herbs.
• 100% Natural - no artificial additives or preservatives


Directions

Adults and children over 12, spray twice under the tongue up to each 30 minutes until symptoms are relieved. For severe symptoms, dosage may be taken up to six times per day. For children under 12, consult a health care professional prior to use.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Ingredients: Arsenicum alb 200C, calc sulph 200C, carbo an 12X, carbo veg 12X, cinchona 200C, hydrastis 12X, nux vom 200C, ornithogalum 12X, pyrigenium 200C, silicea 12X (symptom relief for stomach distress). Inactive ingredients: Organic alcohol 20%, v/v, purified water.
Warnings

• Ask a doctor before use in childrenunder 2 years of age. 
• Stop use and ask a doctor if symptoms persist, worsen or if new symptoms occur. 
• If pregnant or breast-feeding, ask a health professional before use. 
• Do not use if you have had an allergic reaction to this product or any of its ingredients

The product you receive may contain additional details or differ from what is shown on this page, or the product may have additional information revealed by partially peeling back the label. We recommend you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
View printable version Print Page

How to Keep Yourself Safe From Food Poisoning This Summer

One of life’s great joys is sitting down to share a meal with loved ones at restaurants, picnics and backyard barbecues.

But a bad bout of food poisoning can quickly spoil such fun.

Overhead View of Couple Grilling at Summer Barbecue While Carefully Following Tips for the Prevention of Food Posioning | Vitacost.com/blog

How to know if you have food poisoning

Symptoms of food poisoning can range from mild to severe, and often include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Loose stools

Each year, foodborne illness sickens 48 million Americans, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die from this contamination.

There are more than 250 foodborne diseases, mostly infections caused by exposure to bacteria, viruses and parasites. According to the CDC, the five germs most likely to cause foodborne illness are:

  • Norovirus
  • Salmonella
  • Clostridium perfringens
  • Campylobacter
  • Staphylococcus aureus (Staph)

Toxins and chemicals also can contaminate food and trigger foodborne illness.

Sometimes, it can be difficult to distinguish symptoms linked to foodborne illness from a simple case of the flu.

One of the best ways to determine if you have food poisoning – and to identify the food that caused the illness -- is to keep an eye on your dinner companions, says Bruce Ruck, managing director of the New Jersey Poison Center.

“If somebody ate the same thing and got sick, it’s more likely that food,” Ruck says.

By contrast, if somebody ate the same food and didn’t get sick, it may be a different food -- or something else entirely – causing the illness.

When should you see a doctor?

The CDC notes that most cases of food poisoning do not require medical attention and will clear on their own with time.

However, in other instances, you should see a physician promptly. 

“If you’re losing a lot of fluid through either vomiting or diarrhea, you should be seen by a health care professional,” Ruck says. “We want to make sure you do not get dehydrated.”

Telltale signs that you might need to see a doctor include:

  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Vomiting several times and not stopping
  • Light headedness or dizziness
  • An inability to keep fluids down
  • Fever
  • The presence of blood in vomit or stool

In addition, extra caution should be exercised with people who are at greater risk of dehydration

“The elderly need to be seen (by a doctor) sooner,” Ruck says. “Young infants and children need to be seen sooner.”

Pregnant women and people with compromised immune systems also should err on the side of caution if they suspect foodborne illness.

Ruck says people who take prescription medications also should see a physician if they are vomiting or have severe diarrhea, as these symptoms may prevent the body from absorbing the drug.

In short, whether or not to see a physician depends on many different circumstances and varies from situation to situation.

“If you’re not sure, you can always call your local poison center,” Ruck says.

Calling a national number – 800-222-1222 – will get you to your local center, he adds.

Prevention of food poisoning

Preventing food poisoning can be relatively simple. “Food handling and food preparation is probably most important,” Ruck says.

Cook foods to the proper temperature. The CDC offers a handy chart for determining the safe temperature for various types of foods.

When preparing foods, wash your hands frequently in soap and warm water for a minimum of 20 seconds each time.

Also, wash fruits and vegetables before consuming them. Make sure to keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. That helps prevent bacteria from growing.

“In this type of weather, you don’t want to leave foods that are temperature-sensitive – mayonnaise, meat and fish – out in the warm weather, like at your barbecue or picnic,” Ruck says.

Also, avoid cross-contamination of foods. “You don’t want to cut raw chicken, and then cut cooked chicken with the same knife,” Ruck says.  

If you have a limited number of utensils, make sure to wash them between uses – for example, wash a knife with soap and water after using it to cut meat, and before using the same knife to chop up fruit, Ruck says.

Vitacost is not responsible for the content provided in customer ratings and reviews. For more information, visit our Terms of Use.

Sign Up & Save

Get exclusive offers, free shipping events, expert health tips & more by signing up for our promotional emails.

  • Instant Online Service
  • 1-800-381-0759

    Monday-Friday 8am-9pm EST

    Saturday: 9:30am-6pm EST

    Sunday: Closed

Please enter a valid zip code
FLDC1
60158