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MRM Nutrition CoQ-10 Resveratrol Red Yeast Rice -- 60 Softgels


MRM Nutrition CoQ-10 Resveratrol Red Yeast Rice
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MRM Nutrition CoQ-10 Resveratrol Red Yeast Rice -- 60 Softgels

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MRM Nutrition CoQ-10 Resveratrol Red Yeast Rice Description

  • Supports Heart Health
  • Assists Cardiovascular & Circulatory Health
  • Powerful Antioxidant Properties

MRM combination of CoQ-10, Resveratrol and Red Yeast Rice helps provide entire cardiovascular support. This trio of clinically supported ingredients can help support all aspects of cardiovascular health. All 3 possess powerful antioxidant properties to protect against various types of free radical damage. Free radicals can damage cell membranes and arterial walls, as well as damage healthy lipids and cholesterol converting them into their unhealthy and dysfunction counterparts.

 

Coenzyme Q-10 (Ubiquinone), simply called CoQ-10, is an antioxidant that plays many roles contributing to human health. CoQ-10 has shown a myriad of benefits to human health ranging from cardiovascular support to immune and liver health. Our CoQ-10 is naturally derived from a fermentation process as opposed to a synthetic form.

 

CoQ-10 is a crucial compound needed by the mitochondria of every cell to produce energy for the cell, and is especially important to heart, liver and kidney tissue. These organs are known to have high concentrations of mitochondria. CoQ-10 is critical to the function of heart, liver and kidneys where it supports cell membrane stabilization in addition to energy production.

 

Our Red Yeast Rice (Monascus purpureus) is well known as a dietary staple in Asia and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. It is a 100% whole food product through the fermentation of red yeast (Monascus purpureus) and rice that has been used as a natural food colorant, flavor, and preservative. Through the fermentation process, natural active compounds are created that can help support healthy cardiovascular health by helping to normalize your lipid profile. We also can verify that our red yeast rice is gluten free, non-GMO Project Verified, and free of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

 

Lastly is the addition of resveratrol to aid in blood flow and arterial health. Resveratrol to minimize free radical damage, support cardiovascular health and provide anti-inflammatory support for healthy aging.


Directions

Suggested Usage: Take 2 softgels a day with a meal or as directed by your qualified healthcare provider.
Free Of
Added milk, egg, peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, soy, wheat, gluten, yeast ingredients and GMOs.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 2 Softgels
Servings per Container: 30
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Red Yeast Rice (Monascus purpureus)1200 mg*
Asian Knotweed Root Extract
(containing 100 mg Trans-Resveratrol)
200 mg*
Coenzyme Q-10 (as Ubiquinone)100 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Olive oil, softgel (gelatin, glycerin, purified water and carob extract), sunflower lecithin and natural beeswax.
Warnings

Do not use if you are pregnant, may become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. For adults only. Consult physician if taking medication (especially statins), have a medical condition including a history of statin-intolerance, liver disease, or are under 18. If muscle complaints occur, discontinue use and consult a physician.

The product you receive may contain additional details or differ from what is shown on this page, or the product may have additional information revealed by partially peeling back the label. We recommend you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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What are Triglycerides? Understanding Levels, and How to Lower Yours – Naturally

We hear a lot about cholesterol levels but not about another reading we need to keep tabs on for heart and brain health: triglycerides. “Many fail to appreciate that triglycerides and cholesterol are very tightly tied to one another,” says Root Cause Medical Clinic co-founder Dr. Vikki Petersen, a chiropractor, certified clinical nutritionist and certified functional medicine practitioner. “A high triglyceride blood level, when paired with elevated bad cholesterol and low good cholesterol, is a strong risk factor of heart attack and stroke, making your triglyceride levels a very important marker to monitor.”

Concept of What are Triglycerides Represented by Woman Prepping Healthy Meal in Kitchen | Vitacost.com/blog

How do triglyceride and cholesterol readings work?

“Bad cholesterol” refers to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and “good cholesterol” refers to high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Triglycerides are very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). All these get measured by volume in your blood. An easy way to remember whether you want high or low numbers for each one is to think “low” for low-density and “high” for high-density. Your total cholesterol number is your HDL and LDL numbers, plus 20 percent of your triglycerides number. The whole shebang is called your lipid panel. It's generally a good idea to fast for at least 10 hours before a lipid test. Triglyceride levels can surge as much as 30 percent after a meal. Alcohol also makes triglyceride levels rise, so don’t drink alcohol for 24 hours before a fasting cholesterol test, Harvard Medical School advises. Harvard, Cleveland Clinic and many other reputable sources recommend keeping triglyceride readings under 150. Too much LDL and VLDL means fats can start clogging up your arteries, leading to atherosclerosis, creating an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Also, high triglyceride levels are associated with diabetes.

What are triglycerides?

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, Petersen notes. They aren't totally bad — they give you energy. But triglycerides also store excess energy (calories) from what you eat. They hang around in your fat cells until or unless you need them for extra energy. Like cholesterol, triglycerides are fats that aren't soluble in your blood, so they flow through blood by binding to protein, called “lipoprotein.” As triglycerides are delivered to your cells, VLDLs transition to LDLs: their fat content goes down and their protein content goes up, increasing density (get it? from “very low density” to just “low density”). HDLs meanwhile have much more protein than VLDLs or LDLs, hence higher density and are named as such. They are low in cholesterol and have no triglycerides. They actually help carry bad cholesterol away from your cells and blood vessels, allowing your body to eliminate it. “There are other lipoproteins, but not typically measured in a blood panel,” Petersen says. “The one with the highest triglyceride and lowest protein level, making it the least dense, is called a ‘chylomicron.’ Chylomicrons transport lipids from your intestinal tract to your cells.”

Natural ways to lower triglycerides 

Eat whole plant-based foods.

“Diet-wise, what is good for your overall cholesterol is generally good for maintaining healthy triglyceride levels,” Petersen says. “What has been proven is that a healthy plant-based, high-fiber diet — rich in fruit, vegetables, beans, legumes and moderate amounts of healthy oils, nuts and seeds —  is beneficial for maintaining healthy cholesterol levels, healthy triglyceride levels and reversing heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.”

Choose healthier fats.

Trade the saturated fat of meat and dairy products for the polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats in nuts, seeds and olive oil. Stay away from trans-fats and hydrogenated oils or fats.

Avoid sugar and refined carbohydrates.

And completely eliminate any high-fructose corn syrup, Petersen advises. Limit alcohol. Alcohol has lots of calories and sugar. It also strongly affects triglycerides. If you have severe hypertriglyceridemia, avoid drinking any alcohol, Mayo Clinic advises. Exercise. Shoot for at least 30 minutes of physical activity pretty much every day, according to Mayo Clinic. Regular exercise lowers triglycerides and boosts good cholesterol. Remember: Unused calories convert to triglycerides. If you're overweight or obese, “losing just five to 10 percent of your body weight can have a significant impact on your triglyceride levels — up to a 20 percent drop,” Petersen says. Journalist Mitra Malek regularly creates and edits content related to wellness.

Featured product: 

NATURELO Omega-3 Triglyceride Fish Oil | Vitacost.com/blog

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