skip to main content

Nature's Path Organic FlaxPlus Flakes Cinnamon -- 32 oz


Nature's Path Organic FlaxPlus Flakes Cinnamon
In stock
View Similar Products
  • +

Added to My List as a guest.

Your guest list will be saved temporarily during your shopping session.

Sign in to add items to your saved list(s).

1 item added to your list

Nature's Path Organic FlaxPlus Flakes Cinnamon -- 32 oz

Oops! Something went wrong and we were unable to process your request. Please try again.

Nature's Path Organic FlaxPlus Flakes Cinnamon Description

  • Flex Plus Cinnamon Flakes
  • Always Organic
  • 10g Whole Grains
  • 4g Fiber
  • Good Source Of Fiber
  • AnExcellent Source of Ala - Omega 3
  • Less packaging & More Cereal In Our Ecopac!
  • Organic
  • Non GMO Project Verified

We're sincerely obsessed with creating crunchy organic cereals taht don't compromise on taste or ingredietns , so your spoonful (or handful!) is not only good for you, but for the planet too!

 

OUR ORGANIC INGREDIENTS

 

CINNAMON

Fun fact: cinnamon was once more valuable than gold in the ancient world. While this may not hold true today, it's still one of our most valuable spices.

 

FLAX

Often considered a spssuerfood for the ALA Omega-3s contained within these tiny seeds, flax adds a delicious nutty flavor and a boost of nutrition in every bite.

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 2/3 Cup Cereal 30 g
Servings per Container: 30
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories120
Total Fat1 g1%
  Saturated Fat0 g0%
  Trans Fat0 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat0.7 g
  Monounsaturated Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium140 mg6%
Total Carbohydrate24 g9%
  Dietary Fiber4 g14%
  Total Sugars5 g
   Includes Added Sugars5 g11%
Protein3 g
Vitamin D0 mcg0%
Calcium0 mg0%
Iron0.76 mg4%
Potassium120 mg2%
Other Ingredients: Whole wheat meal*, wheat bran*, evaporated cane juice*, flax*, oat bran*, barley malt extract*, sea salt, tocopherols (natural vitamin E), cinnamon*. *Organic. Contains wheat. Produced in a facility that uses soy, peanuts or tree nuts.
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
View printable version Print Page

9 Healthy Food Mistakes That Are Blowing Your Budget

You may think you’re doing everything right, filling your cart with leafy green vegetables, brightly hued fruits and lots of whole grains. Your body may be thanking you for fueling it so well, but your bank account might be suffering. (You know that “whole paycheck” joke.) The truth is, sometimes eating well can be expensive. It’s easy to blow your budget when shopping for healthy foods, especially when you’re not paying attention to what (and how much) is going into your cart. Two nutrition experts share the top spending mistakes people make when shopping for healthy foods in particular, and what to do instead.

https://www.vitacost.com/food-grocery-2

Tips for Shopping on a Budget: 9 Mistakes to Avoid

1. You’re popping into the grocery store all the time.

How many times have you gone to the grocery store to grab one or two things, but ended up leaving with a whole shopping cart instead? Swinging by multiple times a week can actually lead to overspending in the long run, says Josh Axe, DNM, CNS, DC, founder of Ancient Nutrition and DrAxe.com. Instead, plan ahead and make a list of what need (that you’re going to stick to), and limit yourself to one or two shopping trips per week.

2. You’re buying more than you need.

Filling your cart up with fresh fruits and veggies may seem healthy, but if you’re buying more than you need, it can lead to food waste and end up costing you more money. Aim to purchase only the amount of produce that you know you’ll be able to finish, says Axe. “You can always keep some staples on hand like canned goods, frozen veggies and dried legumes to hold you over if you run out before the week is over,” he adds.

3. You’re wasting food.

Just like buying more than you need can take a toll on your budget, throwing away food scraps instead of repurposing them can also cost you extra cash, says Axe. Get more bang for your buck by using bones from meat or veggie scraps to make stock, adding wilted vegetables to soups or smoothies, making stale bread into breadcrumbs or croutons, or steeping apple peels in hot water to make tea.

4. You’re shopping in the wrong sections.

While studies show there are some benefits to buying organic produce, it does come at a price: A 2015 analysis by Consumer Reports showed organic food products cost an average of 47 percent more than conventional food products. Being picky about which organic produce you purchase can help minimize your grocery bill without giving up what’s important to you. Axe recommends purchasing organic fruits and vegetables listed on the Environmental Working Group’s annual “Dirty Dozen” list to reduce your exposure to pesticides, and saving by choosing non-organic produce from EWG’s “Clean Fifteen” list. This includes items like avocados, sweet corn, pineapples, onions and asparagus.

5. You’re not doing your math according to your schedule and recipes.

Many people buy the same quantities of food weekly and don't budget in for opportunities within that week where they won't be eating at home (say, an office happy hour or dinner out with friends), or they overspend for a single recipe, says Monica Auslander Moreno, MS, RD, LDN, a nutrition consultant for RSP Nutrition. For the latter, consider what easy substitutions you can make to save. For example, “You don't need to buy a $14 dollar bag of almond flour for a recipe that calls for 2 tablespoons—use rolled oats [instead],” says Moreno.

6. You’re buying convenience meals.

Many processed products and convenience meals are labeled as “healthy” or “low-calorie,” but not only are these products not as good for you as you might think (they’re often laden with added sodium, preservatives and artificial sweeteners), they also can come with a pretty high price tag. Getting in the kitchen and preparing your own meals from fresh ingredients is a great way to take control of what you’re putting on your plate and help you stretch your budget in the process, says Axe.

7. You’re forgetting about the freezer section.

Fresh fruits and vegetables are great, but they can often be more expensive and lower in quality when out of season, says Axe. Instead, purchase your favorite produce fresh when it’s in season, and opt for frozen varieties during the rest of the year. Frozen fruits and vegetables offer the same about the same set of nutrients as fresh, help you save money and also last longer in the freezer.

8. You’re meal prepping with the wrong containers.

Meal prepping is a great tool that can help you save time, money and energy during the week, but you might be sabotaging your efforts if you’re not choosing the right size and quality of meal prep containers, says Axe. You should be using high-quality, glass containers that help preserve your food to last for the week, preventing food waste; and that are suitable to your portion sizes, preventing you from buying (and eating) too large of servings.  

9. You’re paying a premium for “fancy flavors.”

While those holiday treats are enticing, they’re an enemy to your wallet. “Tis the season for flavored everything—especially yogurts, milks and kefir,” says Moreno. “It's easy to spend $4 per serving on a fall fig yogurt, but you could buy a huge tub of plain yogurt for about the same price and add your own fresh figs instead, which would maximize nutrition and flavor as well. 

Sponsored Link
Sign Up & Save

Get exclusive offers, free shipping events, expert health tips & more by signing up for our promotional emails.

Please enter a valid zip code
FLDC8
133480