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NutriBiotic Raw Rice Protein Powder Chocolate -- 1.69 lbs


NutriBiotic Raw Rice Protein Powder Chocolate
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NutriBiotic Raw Rice Protein Powder Chocolate -- 1.69 lbs

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Save 20% off Code CYBERSUPPS Ends: 7/18 at 9 a.m. ET

NutriBiotic Raw Rice Protein Powder Chocolate Description

  • Gluten Free
  • 70% Protein
  • Vegetarian / Vegan

NutriBiotic Vegetarian Chocolate Rice Protein is a high quality, low carbohydrate vegetable protein. This easily digestible protein provides an extensive array of naturally occurring amino acids, the building blocks of protein. 

 

Boost your nutrition and energy with this healthy and wholesome, protein rich formula!

 

NutriBiotic Vegetarian Rice Protein is produced by means of a unique enzyme process. A proprietary blend of organic plant enzymes are used to separate the fiber and carbohydrates from the protein portion of the whole grain brown rice. Low temperatures used during processing prevent denaturing of the amino acids. NO CHEMICALS are used at any times. Due to this enzyme process, color, taste, and texture may vary.

 

GLUTEN FREE • GMO FREE • PESTICIDE, HERBICIDE & PCB FREE


Directions

As a protein source, add serving to a shaker bottle or glass. Add water, rice milk, or beverage of your choice. Shake or mix well. You may also add a serving to your favorite smoothie or recipe.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Heaping Tbsp. (16 g)
Servings per Container: 40
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories60*
   Calories from Fat0*
Total Fat0 g0%
   Saturated Fat0 g0%
   Trans Fat0 g*
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium10 mg< 1%
Total Carbohydrate2 g< 1%
   Dietary Fiber Less than1 g2.0%
   Sugars1 g*
Protein11 g*
Iron2 mg11%
Phosphorus80 mg8%
Naturally Occurring Amino Acids Per 16 g Serving*
Alanine539 mg*
Arginine750 mg*
Aspartic Acid1001 mg*
Cystine264 mg*
Glutamic Acid1893 mg*
Glycine347 mg*
Histidine247 mg*
Isoleucine642 mg*
Leucine1001 mg*
Lysine563 mg*
Methionine253 mg*
Phenylalanine482 mg*
Proline671 mg*
Serine545 mg*
Threonine522 mg*
Tryptophan171 mg*
Tyrosine451 mg*
Valine662 mg*
Not a significant source of vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, or iron.
***Essential Amino Acid
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Enzymatically processed rice protein from whole grain, sprouted brown rice, rice syrup solids, cocoa powder and natural vanilla flavors.
Contains Soy Made on equipment that also processes milk chocolate
Warnings

As with any supplement, you should consult your physician before using this product. If you are nursing, pregnant, or considering pregnancy, you should consult your healthcare practitioner prior to using this product.

 

California Residents: This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information regarding this warning see California Prop. 65.

The product you receive may contain additional details or differ from what is shown on this page, or the product may have additional information revealed by partially peeling back the label. We recommend you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Making Smoothies: Are You Doing it Wrong?

Blending a smoothie is a fast and delicious way to quickly satisfy your hunger. Do it right, and you can also add a wealth of vitamins and minerals to your diet.

But not all smoothies are created equal, and even the best and most nutritious smoothie recipes come with some caveats.

Torso View of Woman Learning How to Make a Smoothie Pouring Milk Into a Blender with Fruit | Vitacost.com/blog

Downing a smoothie can make sense in some situations. For example, data has shown that obtaining protein and carbohydrate in liquid form might help it get into the muscle much faster than it would in a mixed meal, says Angela Lemond, a Plano, Texas-based registered dietitian nutritionist and founder of Lemond Nutrition.

“The advantage here would be after a workout,” she says. “It may maximize muscle building and decrease muscle soreness.”

Drinking smoothies also can be a great way to eat foods that many people instinctively do not enjoy – such as spinach or kale – and that offer important vitamins and minerals. The mix of flavors in a green smoothie disguises the taste of foods that some find unpalatable.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture also lauds smoothies as way to increase fruit and vegetable intake, and to add foods such as flaxseed, kefir and herbs to your diet. Smoothies also can add a dose of protein and calcium into your daily meal plan.

The downsides of smoothies

However, even the best smoothies have downsides. For starters, Lemond notes that blending fruit into a smoothie can boost natural sugar totals much higher than what you would take in if you ate the fruit whole.

“It's really the potential caloric load,” she says. “Since they are blenderized, the concentration of the calories can go high really quick even with good quality ingredients.”

Others have warned that adding high-sugar yogurt and unhealthy ice cream to smoothies can outweigh the potential health benefits of such a drink.

For most people, it makes more sense to consume healthful fruits and vegetables in ways that don’t rely on blending them, Lemond says.

“The digestion process is a natural thing the body does to slowly process food for sustained energy,” she says. “Blenderizing does some of the work for the body, so the food does not stay in the system as long.”

As a result, smoothies are less likely to satisfy your hunger as effectively as a mixed, whole meal, she says.

How to make a smoothie the right way

Despite such concerns, smoothies can still be a great way to for some people to get important nutrients they otherwise might miss.

A 2015 study found that when fruit smoothies were introduced as a breakfast item at two Utah high schools, the percentage of students who consumed the equivalent of at least one serving of whole fruit each day soared from 4.3 percent prior to the menu change to a whopping 45.1 percent after.

If you love to consume smoothies, make sure you do it right. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests consuming smoothies without adding any sugar.

The natural fruit in a smoothie should provide more than enough sweetness, the CDC says.

Lemond suggests the following recipe:

  • 8 ounces of milk or milk alternative
  • 1 cup of a fruit of your choice
  • And unlimited amount of a vegetable of your choice
  • 10 to 20 grams of a protein source of your choice -- protein powder, nut or seed
  • Ice or additional water as desired

Such a recipe provides a nice balance of macronutrients such as carbohydrates, fat and protein, she says. Still, Lemond urges you to make a smoothie a relatively rare treat.

“Smoothies are best used when recovering from a workout, if at all,” she says.

Vitacost is not responsible for the content provided in customer ratings and reviews. For more information, visit our Terms of Use.

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