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Olympian Labs Grape Seed Extra Strength -- 200 mg - 100 Capsules


Olympian Labs Grape Seed Extra Strength
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Olympian Labs Grape Seed Extra Strength -- 200 mg - 100 Capsules

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Olympian Labs Grape Seed Extra Strength Description

OPC's from Grape Seed:
-- Contains no chemical solvents
-- Extract 80:1
-- Contains Oligomeric Procyanidins
-- Vegetarian & Kosher capsules

Olympian Labs Grape Seed Extract contains 95% Oligomeric Proanthocyanidin B2-3'-O-gallate.  Oligomeric Procyanidins are a more potent antioxidant than those from pine bark.  Pycnogenols is a generic chemical term used to distinguish the polyphenolic class of bioflavonoids which contain Flavin-3-ols from the simpler bioflavonoids.  These Pycnogenols are also called Oligomeric Procyanidins.  Both these terms refer to the condensed structure of the Flavonol molecule.  Olympian Labs Grape Seed Extract, through a low temperature extraction method, is completely water soluble and free of dangerous solvents and food coloring additives.  Water solubility means optimum bioavailability.


Directions

As a dietary supplement, take one (1) to two (2) capsules daily, or as directed by a healthcare professional.
Free Of
Corn, yeast, barley, wheat, soy, lactose, all milk products, citrus, fish, egg products, added flavorings, sugar, sweeteners, salt, preservatives, salicylates, artificial colors and coatings.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Capsule
Servings per Container: 100
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Powerful Antioxidant Proprietary Blend Grape Seed Extract 95% Oligomeric Procyanidins 80:1 and Grape Skin Extract200 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Microcrystalline cellulose (plant fiber), rice flour, magnesium stearate and silica.
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Mixing Medications & Supplements? Follow These Pharmacist Tips

To mix or not to mix — that is the question. Dietary supplements have become increasingly popular in the last few years; but just because you can buy them at grocery stores or online through retailers like Vitacost.com doesn’t mean that they come risk-free. Dietary supplements — much like medications — can have drawbacks or side effects — especially when you take the two together. Some dietary supplements work well with medications, but at times, they can be like oil and water: they just don’t mix. Before combining any pair (or multiple supps and meds), consider the following guidelines. Closeup View of Handing Mixing Mediations and Supplements in Blue Daily Pill Case | Vitacost.com/blog

A Guide to Mixing Medications & Supplements

Multivitamins

Multivitamins claim the top spot for the most-purchased dietary supplements. These popular supplements offer a variety of benefits (including filling in nutrient "gaps" if you're not getting what you need through diet alone) and are considered generally safe; but sometimes multivitamins can interfere with common medications. If you’ve ever taken certain antibiotics — such as fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, etc.) — you may already know that you should avoid taking minerals such as calcium and magnesium within a two hour window of taking antibiotics in this class. (Note: Moxifloxacin requires a four-hour wait time.) These minerals can interfere with the intended effects of the medication. Multivitamins (which often contain calcium, magnesium and other minerals that interact with fluoroquinolone antibiotics) should be similarly timed. Multivitamins can also interact with certain medications taken for cholesterol and diabetes, such as colesevelam or sevelamer (prescribed for people with kidney disease). Allow at least two hours between taking a multivitamin and these medications. Additionally, caution is also needed if you're taking the diet medication orlistat. Orlistat works by preventing the body from absorbing fat; but in the process, it can block the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamins A, D, K and E. If you are taking orlistat, you may already be at risk for deficiency of these vitamins. Typically, this problem is solved easily by taking a multivitamin containing these nutrients. Just be sure to allow a few hours to pass before taking your multi.

Soy and soy-containing supplements

You might think of soy in its popular food forms --  whole as soybeans or edamame, processed into tofu or tempeh or drinkable as soy milk. But soy has industrial uses, too. Manufacturers often use soy in rubber, plastics, adhesives, coatings and solvents. You might even see it listed as ingredient in personal care products like lotions or hair products. When it comes to food and dietary supplements, you’ll often find soy in the form of soy lecithin — a binder that helps materials stick together and blend smoothly during production. Soy has been shown to have some health benefits, and some women may consume soy or soy-based products during menopause to help relieve discomforts. Yet, it's important to note that soy mimics the effects of estrogen in the body, which can be a problem for women with breast cancer. In fact, if you have estrogen-dominant breast cancer, your doctor may tell you to avoid eating soy foods or taking  dietary supplements that contain soy. Some studies suggest that soy interferes with tamoxifen, a medication used to treat estrogen-dominant breast cancer. However, other studies suggest soy either bears no effect on tamoxifen or even boosts the effects of the cancer drug. Also to note: Some data shows that soy-containing supplements may weaken the effects of codeine — which may not be ideal if you're  taking codeine for pain or cough.

St. John’s wort

St. John's wort is well known to interfere with the effects of many medications, including: 1. Antidepressants
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline
  • Tricyclic antidepressants: nortriptyline, imipramine, amitriptyline
2. HIV/AIDS medications such as ritonavir 3. Antibiotics: clarithromycin and clarithromycin 4. Triptans, for migraines 5. Warfarin, a blood thinning medication 6. Phenytoin, for seizures Additionally, if you are taking birth control to avoid pregnancy, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist before taking St. John's wort, as it may diminish the intended effects of your birth control medication.

Other dietary supplements (with warfarin)

Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several new blood thinners over the last decade, warfarin is still one of the most commonly prescribed medications. If you're taking warfarin or something similar, take caution with supplements such as ginseng, gingko biloba, green tea, garlic and St. John’s wort. Although these supplements are not considered blood thinners, they may increase some of the warfarin’s blood thinning effects.

In summary

Takin supplements is a great way to support your overall health and wellness. But if you're taking medications of any kind, it's important to discuss your supplement regimen with a healthcare provider. Educate yourself to stay safe -- and to reap the benefits of your dietary supplements.
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