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Sprout Organic Baby Food Smoothie Peach Banana with Yogurt Veggies & Flax Seed Toddler -- 4 oz Each / Pack of 6


Sprout Organic Baby Food Smoothie Peach Banana with Yogurt Veggies & Flax Seed Toddler
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Sprout Organic Baby Food Smoothie Peach Banana with Yogurt Veggies & Flax Seed Toddler -- 4 oz Each / Pack of 6

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15% off $40: Hurry, enter promo code ALLFOOD40 at checkout by 8/4 at 9 a.m. ET to save!

Sprout Organic Baby Food Smoothie Peach Banana with Yogurt Veggies & Flax Seed Toddler Description

  • Dairy Free
  • 3g Protein
  • 2g Fiber
  • Full Serving of Fruit
  • USDA Organic
  • Non-GMO Project Verified
  • Kosher
  • 6 - 4 oz. Pouches

Dairy Free Organic Smoothie: This creamy blend of whole, organic fruits, yogurt, veggies & flax seed provides 3 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, & a full serving of fruit for active toddlers!

 

Toddler Nutrition: Sprout's yogurt based smoothie blends are a quick, convenient way to help your toddler get the essential nutrients they need with the flavors they love in a hearty, filling snack!

 

Sprout Toddler Smoothies: are made only with USDA Certified Organic & non-GMO ingredients, & contain no concentrates, additives, preservatives, or fillers of any kind—only honest, pure ingredients.


Directions

Shake well before serving. Do not microwave or freeze pouch. After opening, refrigerate and consume within 24 hours.
Free Of
Gluten, GMOs, dairy, concentrates, preservatives.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Pouch (113 g)
Servings per Container: 1
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories90
Total Fat0 g0%
   Saturated Fat0 g0%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium10 mg1%
Total Carbohydrate18 g12%
   Dietary Fiber2 g14%
   Total Sugars13 g
     Includes 0g Added Sugars0%
Protein3 g21%
Vitamin D0 mcg0%
Calcium65 mg10%
Iron0 mg0%
Potassium347 mg10%
Vitamin A10 mcg4%
Vitamin C6 mg40%
Magnesium1 mg2%
Manganese0.1 mg8%
Other Ingredients: Organic peaches, organic bananas, organic apples, organic dried nonfat milk yogurt (organic cultured nonfat milk), organic carrots, organic butternut squash, organic lemon juice, organic flax seed.
Contains Milk.
Warnings

This product has a small cap and could present a choking hazard for children under 3 years.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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How to Safely Expose Your Baby to Allergenic Foods

Worried that your child might develop food allergies? As it turns out, one of the best ways to prevent allergies later in life is to make sure kids eat potentially troublesome foods when they are very young. Smiling Baby in Striped Blue Shirt in High Chair Experiencing Early Allergen Introduction with Baby Food | Vitacost.com/blogA growing body of evidence supports such an approach. For example, a 2019 study of more than 1,300 infants in England and Wales found that children introduced to allergenic foods at 3 months of age were less likely to develop food allergies than infants solely breastfed for the first 6 months of their lives. Just 19.2% of children introduced to allergenic foods early in life went on to develop food allergies. That compares to 34.2% of children who later developed food allergies after not being exposed to allergenic foods at a very young age.

Changing theories about when to introduce foods

These recent findings run counter to previous theories. In the past, parents were told to delay introduction of allergens -- such as nuts, peanuts and eggs -- until a child was 2 years old, says Kelly Jones, a Philadelphia-based registered dietitian nutritionist and mom who was not involved in the British study. But as researchers have learned more about how allergies develop, expert advice has changed. "The American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends exposing your child to these foods between 4 (months) and 6 months of age," says Jones, who also is a certified specialist in sports dietetics. Jones says she understands why some parents may be reluctant to embrace the new recommendations regarding early allergen introduction. “It can be easy to want to trust whatever you did for an older child, or what your parents did when you began eating,” she says. In addition, some parents might worry about harming their children by introducing potential allergens at a young age, although Jones says most adverse reactions tend to be mild. “Anaphylactic shock is unlikely in an infant” she says. “Early allergy signs upon first exposures to foods are more likely to be rashes, digestive symptoms or runny noses.”

Safety tips for introducing allergenic foods early

Jones notes that allergy rates have increased dramatically among the general population in recent decades, making it more important to take steps to prevent such allergies from developing. However, she also says many parents have legitimate fears that introducing allergenic foods early in life puts their kids in danger of choking on foods such as peanuts, almonds and cashews. “Even offering them in peanut or nut butter form can be too sticky for infants to safely swallow,” Jones says. To introduce such foods safely, she suggests trying no-sugar-added peanut butter puff snacks. Or, mix no-sugar-added peanut butter powder or almond butter powder with water “so it has a more liquid texture.” Mix these liquids with the child’s normal foods, such as baby cereals or oatmeal. You can even add them in small amounts to a bottle or smoothie. Scrambled eggs also are a “completely acceptable” food to offer a 6-month-old, since children that age can pick up the eggs and put them in their mouth themselves. “Many parents are also not aware that babies can begin eating solid foods, so long as they are soft enough, without having to rely on purees first,” Jones says. Jones says her website has a recipe for easy infant pancakes – which are also rich in iron – that offers a “nice soft option that exposes the infant to eggs, nuts and/or peanuts.” “Some companies have even come out with products to make introduction easier, including fruit and veggie pouches with allergenic foods added,” Jones says.

Getting more help

In addition to worrying about how their children might react to allergenic foods, some parents might feel they are at risk of harming themselves if they have allergies to the foods they are trying to introduce to their kids. If you have such concerns – or any others -- consider reaching out to your family doctor. “High-risk families should always speak with their pediatrician before introducing allergenic foods to their infant,” Jones says. She adds that you can also request your infant be exposed to allergenic foods for the first time in the doctor's office, or ask for a referral to a pediatric registered dietitian.
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