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Sun Bum Original Sunscreen Lotion SPF 50 -- 6 fl oz


Sun Bum Original Sunscreen Lotion SPF 50
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Sun Bum Original Sunscreen Lotion SPF 50 -- 6 fl oz

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Sun Bum Original Sunscreen Lotion SPF 50 Description

  • Premium Moisturizing Sunscreen Lotion
  • Broad Spectrum SPF 50
  • UVA/UVB Protection With Parsol® 1789
  • Water Resistant (80 Minutes)
  • Gluten Free and Vegan
  • Antioxidant Enriched (Vitamin E)
  • Dermatologist Tested

This is the stuff we use every day. The moisturizing sunscreen formula that started it all.

 

Original Sunscreen Lotion - SPF 50

This moisturizing sunscreen formula will protect your skin from harmful UVA/UVB rays while enriching your skin with Vitamin E, an antioxidant that helps to neutralize free radicals, which are the main cause of premature skin aging.

 

What's Inside

 

Good Stuff

• Vitamin E: An antioxidant that helps to neutralize free radicals, which are the main cause of premature skin aging.

• Sun Bum Original Scent: People say it smells like summer®. We like that.

 

Trust The Bum

Broad Spectrum UVA / UVB Protection, Hypoallergenic, Reef Friendly / Oxybenzone Free & Octinoxate Free, Cruelty Free, Vegan, Oil Free, Paraben Free, Gluten Free, PABA Free, Sun Bum Original Scent, Water Resistant (80 Minutes)


Directions

Dispense in hand and apply to body. We recommend working from head to toe so you don't accidentally miss a limb. If you need help reaching your back, ask a friend— that's what they're for. Apply liberally and allow it to absorb, waiting at least 30 minutes before sun exposure. Reapply at least every two hours. Apply more frequently after swimming/sweating, or after an aggressive towel dry. Always offer to share.
Free Of
Oxybenzone, octinoxate, animal testing, animal ingredients, oil, paraben, gluten and PABA.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Ingredients: Acitve Ingredients: Avobenzone 3.00%, homosalate 10.00%, octisalate 5.00%, octocrylene 10.00%. Inactive Ingredients: Water, butyloctyl salicylate, hydrated silica, VP/hexadecene copolymer, styrene/acrylates copolymer, dimethicone, polyester-8, caprylyl methicone, ethylhexyl stearate, trideceth-6, glyceryl stearate, PEG-100 stearate, fragrance, sodium polyacrylate, behenyl alcohol, dimethyl capramide, ethylhexylglycerin, trimethylsiloxysilicate, xanthan gum, polyaminopropyl biguanide, tocopheryl acetate, BHT, disodium EDTA, methylisothiazolinone.
Warnings

For external use only. Do not use: on damaged or broken skin. When using this product: Keep out of eyes. Rinse with water to remove. Stop use and ask a doctor if: rash occurs. Keep out of reach of children. If product is swallowed, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Does Using Sunscreen Cause Vitamin D Deficiency?

We slather on sunscreen to block harmful UVB light, which can lead to sunburn and skin cancer. But does sunscreen also completely block absorption of vitamin D, known as the “sunshine vitamin”? The short answer: no.

Hands Holding Bottle of Sunscreen Against Cloudy Blue Sky to Represent Sunscreen and Vitamin D Connection | Vitacost.com/blog

The relationship between sunscreen and vitamin D

As Harvard Medical School points out, the use of sunscreen theoretically lowers the amount of vitamin D we absorb. However, studies show everyday use of sunscreen does not shut down the body’s ability to synthesize vitamin D. For instance, a study published in 2019 in the British Journal of Dermatology found that sunscreen does not hinder production of vitamin D. An earlier study, published in 1995 in the Archives of Dermatology, came to a similar conclusion. A research review published in 2013 in the journal Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine indicated that while applying recommended amounts of sunscreen reduces vitamin D synthesis, it does not cause decreased levels of vitamin D. “Studies have never found that everyday sunscreen use leads to vitamin D insufficiency. In fact, people who use sunscreen daily can maintain their vitamin D levels,” the Skin Cancer Foundation proclaims.

Vitacost Vitamin D3 (as Cholecalciferol) | Vitacost.com/blogWhat does vitamin D do?

We gain vitamin D from three sources: the sun, food and nutritional supplements. Exposure to sunlight enables the body to manufacture vitamin D. Even if sunscreen did block vitamin D, we’d still be able to get enough of the vitamin from vitamin D-fortified foods and from nutritional supplements, medical experts say. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which strengthens our bones. Our muscles and nerves also depend on vitamin D. Among other things, a lack of vitamin D may trigger osteoporosis, broken bones, muscle weakness or decreased immunity. Also, people with rheumatoid arthritis may suffer from vitamin D deficiency. For those who are thinking about boosting their vitamin D intake through sun exposure, the Moffitt Cancer Center offers this warning: “Because there is no scientifically validated, safe threshold level of UV exposure that allows for maximum vitamin D production without increasing the risk of skin cancer, most experts continue to recommend the daily use of sunscreen for everyone, including those who spend most or all of their time indoors.”

How to get more vitamin D

In fact, the American Academy of Dermatology advises against intentionally not applying sunscreen to crank up production of vitamin D through unexposed skin. Instead, medical experts suggest making up for any loss of vitamin D due to lack of sun exposure by eating more vitamin D-fortified foods (like milk, yogurt, breakfast cereal and orange juice) or taking nutritional supplements that include vitamin D. Few foods naturally contain vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health. But those that do include fatty fish, cheese and egg yolk. Bumping up your intake of vitamin D through food or nutritional supplements may be especially important if you typically avoid sunlight, mostly stay in the shade when outdoors, regularly wear long sleeves outside or have darker skin pigmentation, according to the research review published in 2013.

Hello Bello Sunscreen Mineral Lotion SPF 55+ | Vitacost.com/blogVitamin D and COVID-19

By the way, a study released in May 2021 found “little to no evidence” that normal levels of vitamin D limit the risk or severity of COVID-19. This research came on the heels of a study published in March 2021 that suggested above-normal levels of vitamin D might lower the risk of COVID-19 infection. “There’s a lot of literature on vitamin D. Most of it has been focused on bone health, which is where the current standards for sufficient vitamin D levels come from,” Dr. David Meltzer, lead author of the March 2021 study and chief of hospital medicine at the University of Chicago, says in a news release. “But there’s also some evidence that vitamin D might improve immune function and decrease inflammation.” “So far, the data has been relatively inconclusive,” Meltzer adds. “Based on these results, we think that earlier studies may have given doses that were too low to have much of an effect on the immune system, even if they were sufficient for bone health. It may be that different levels of vitamin D are adequate for different functions.” These statements have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease.
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