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Terry Naturally Clinical OPC® Heart -- 60 Capsules


Terry Naturally Clinical OPC® Heart
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Terry Naturally Clinical OPC® Heart -- 60 Capsules

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Terry Naturally Clinical OPC® Heart Description

  • French Grape Seed Extract VX1®
  • With Pomegranate, Magnesium, Benfotiamine, and Vitamin B6
  • 99% Tannin Free • Polyphenols
  • Vegan

Healthy Heart Factors

  • French Grape Seed VX1® Healthy blood pressure and cholesterol balance
  • Pomegranate Healthy arteries and blood vessel flexibility
  • Magnesium Healthy heart rhythm and blood pressure levels
  • Benfotiamine (Vitamin B1) Healthy blood vessels, circulation, and arterial function
  • Vitamin B6 Crucial to the system that transports oxygen and blood to the heart

Clinical OPC® Heart delivers high-quality, clinically studied ingredients in their most effective bioavailable forms, making it easy for your body to absorb and benefit from premium nutrients.

 

Life-Enhancing Heart Benefits

 

Clinical OCP® Heart features concentrated levels of the most influential heart-healthy ingredients to help fill nutritional gaps in your diet and promote optimal cardiovascular function.

  • Oxygen and blood flow to the heart
  • Cholesterol balance
  • Blood pressure
  • Heart rhythms
  • Overall cardiovascular function


Directions

Recommendations: Take 3 capsules daily.
Free Of
Sugar, salt, yeast, wheat, gluten, corn, soy, dairy products, artificial coloring, artificial flavoring, artificial preservatives and GMOs.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 3 Capsules
Servings per Container: 20
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Vitamin B6 (as pyridoxal-5-phosphate)30 mg1,765%
Magnesium (from TRAACS® magnesium bisglycinate chelate, magnesium oxide)300 mg71%
Proprietary Complex
French Grape (Vitis vinifera) Seed Extract (VX1®) standardized to contain greater than or equal to 99% polyphenols and greater than or equal to 80% OPCs (Tannin Free), Pomegranate (Punica granatum) Fruit Extract standardized for greater than or equal to 60% polyphenols
600 mg*
Benfotiamine150 mg*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Hydropxypropyl methylcellulose (vegetable cellulose capsules), citric acid, maltodextrin, silica, vegetable source magnesium stearate, cellulose powder.
Warnings

If pregnant or nursing, consult a healthcare practitioner before use.

The product you receive may contain additional details or differ from what is shown on this page, or the product may have additional information revealed by partially peeling back the label. We recommend you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
View printable version Print Page

Are Plant-Based Diets Actually Harmful to Heart Health?

This headline for an article posted on the website of the American College of Cardiology might seem alarming: “Some Plant-Based Diets May Increase Heart Disease Risk.” However, for many people who follow plant-based diets, there’s no reason to be alarmed.

The headline refers to a study published in mid-July in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that raised the specter of some plant-based diets actually elevating your risk for heart disease.

Plant-Based Diet Fruits and Vegetables Arranged to Create Question Mark | Vitacost.com/blog

The study showed that a healthier plant-based diet — featuring whole grains, fruits, vegetables and the like — was tied to a lower risk of heart disease. But the study also showed that a plant-based diet emphasizing not-so-healthy plant foods like sweetened beverages, refined grains, potatoes and sweets was associated with a higher risk for heart disease.

“It’s apparent that there is a wide variation in the nutritional quality of plant foods, making it crucial to take into consideration the quality of foods in a plant-based diet,” Ambika Satija, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and lead author of the study, says in a news release.

It’s worth noting, as the Lifehacker website did, that the study scored people who ate both meat and plants, and how close they were to consuming a “healthy” or “unhealthy” plant-based diet.

“The study also didn’t distinguish between healthy and unhealthy animal products: fish, yogurt and bacon grease would all lower your scores equally,” Lifehacker says.

So, how should you react to the study’s findings?

Richard VanVranken, an agricultural agent with Rutgers Cooperative Extension in Atlantic County, New Jersey, has eaten a mostly plant-based diet for over 35 years. He says true vegetarians shouldn’t be concerned about the results of the study. Instead, it should be those people who’ve reduced or eliminated consumption of meat but continue to chow down on fried, refined and overly sweet foods.

“The study supports previous work that has shown an overall plant-based diet reduces heart disease risk, but adds to it that a defined, healthy plant-based diet reduces that risk even more,” VanVranken says.

“Unfortunately,” he adds, “there are plant-based diets that can still include a lot of foods that are not good for heart health, and that is the even greater revelation of this study. Someone who thinks they’re eating healthier by just cutting out meat without cutting back on sweetened beverages, refined grains and sweets may actually be increasing their risk for heart disease.”

In a Journal of the American College of Cardiology editorial accompanying the study, Dr. Kim Allan Williams, chair of the division of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, wrote that plant-based diets featuring whole grains, unsaturated fats and an abundance of fruits and vegetables “deserve more emphasis in dietary recommendations.” Williams, who switched to a vegan diet in 2003, is former president of the American College of Cardiology.

In other words, if you’re a vegetarian or vegan who sticks to a diet that’s free of the bad stuff but full of the good stuff, you’re on the right track in protecting your heart health.

Despite that reality, VanVranken says he’s afraid that headlines about the study might prompt “fad-following vegetarians” to ditch plant-based diets or “anti-vegetarian folks” to use those headlines as a weapon.

“Conversely, what really needs to be done is to correctly point out the differences between a ‘healthy’ plant-based diet and an ‘unhealthy’ plant-based diet to make sure those fad followers,” he says, “and even those who have good intentions but are poorly educated about vegetarian diets understand that simply dropping meat from your meals is not necessarily a healthy choice. This study puts legitimate research findings behind that argument and defines that healthy plant-based diet.”

Certified health coach and nutritional consultant Jared Koch says he wasn’t surprised by the study’s findings, since eating more nutrient-dense, plant-based foods — like fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts — “is the single best thing you can do to improve your diet and health.”

“Whether you should be eating animal foods or not is ultimately determined by what your individual body needs,” Koch says. “If you do eat them, choose high-quality versions as much as possible, such as organic and grass-fed. Either way, eat a lot of vegetables and reduce your intake of sugar and chemical-laden junk foods.”

Along those lines, the American College of Cardiology recently issued recommendations urging hospitals to improve patient menus by adding healthy plant-based options and removing processed meats. That followed passage of a resolution by the American Medical Association calling on hospitals to offer healthy plant-based meals and cut processed meats from patient menus.

“Too many heart disease patients have had their recovery undermined by bacon and hot dogs on their hospital trays,” Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, says in a news release. “Hospitals that ban processed meats and promote plant-based meals will do a better job at helping patients’ hearts heal.”

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