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Garden of Life Raw Organic Protein & Greens™ Lightly Sweet -- 23 oz


Garden of Life Raw Organic Protein & Greens™ Lightly Sweet


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Garden of Life Raw Organic Protein & Greens™ Lightly Sweet -- 23 oz

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Garden of Life Raw Organic Protein & Greens™ Lightly Sweet Description

  • Organic Plant Formula
  • Organic Spinach, Kale, Broccoli & Alfalfa Grass Juice
  • Raw • Vegan • Gluten Free • Dairy Free • Soy Free
  • 20 g Protein • 6 Veggies • <1g Sugar
  • USDA Organic
  • Non-GMO Verified
  • Kosher • Certified Vegan
  • Soy Free • Dairy Free

A delicious protein boost from organic sprouted brown rice, organic pea & organic chia, plus a blend of nutrient-rich, energizing greens.

  • Clean- Certified Vegan
  • Ttaceable - USDA Organic & Non-GMO Verified
  • Pure - RAW, Soy and Dairy Free

Raw Organic Plant Protein

Organic Pea, Organic Sprouted Brown Rice, Organic Chia, Organic Navy Bean, Organic Lentil Bean, Organic Garbanzo Bean

 

Raw Organic Greens

Organic Alfalfa Grass Juice, Organic Spinach, Organic Kale, Organic Broccoli, Carrot & Beet

 

Raw Probiotics & Enzymes

1.5 Billion Live Probiotics & 13 Enzymes

 


Directions

Mix 1 level scoop (scoop included) with 8 oz of water. Delicious with unsweetened almond milk.

Free Of
Dairy, soy, tree nuts, added sugars, filler ingredients, artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners and preservatives.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Scoop (32.5 g)
Servings per Container: 20
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories130
Total Fat1 g1%
   Saturated Fat0 g
   Trans Fat0 g
   Polyunsaturated Fat0.5 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium140 mg6%
Total Carbohydrate10 g4%
   Dietary Fiber3 g11%
    Soluble Fiber1 g
    Insoluble Fiber2 g
   Total Sugars Less than6 g
     Includes 5g Added Sugars10%
Protein20 g27%
Calcium60 mg4%
Iron4 mg20%
Potassium120 mg2%
Vitamin A120 mcg15%
Vitamin C2.4 mg2%
Vitamin K32 mcg25%
Folate8 mcg2%
Biotin6 mcg20%
Phosphorus200 mg15%
Magnesium40 mg10%
Zinc3 mg25%
Selenium25 mcg45%
Manganese1.6 mg70%
Chromium9.6 mcg25%
Molybdenum75 mcg170%
Not a significant source of Vitamin D
Typical Amino Acid Profile (Per 32.5 g Serving)
Alanine969 mg
Arginine1640 mg
Aspartic Acid1980 mg
Cystine312 mg
Glutamic Acid3250 mg
Glycine832 mg
Histidine441 mg
Isoleucine **^927 mg
Leucine **^1600 mg
Lysine **1030 mg
Methionine **396 mg
Phenylalanine **1030 mg
Proline919 mg
Serine932 mg
Threonine **710 mg
Tryptophan **256 mg
Tyrosine919 mg
Valine **^1070 mg
**Essential Amino Acids ^Branched Chain Amino Acids
Other Ingredients: Organic Raw Protein & Greens Blend: Organic pea protein, organic sprouted brown rice protein, organic spinach (leaf), organic chia protein, organic alfalfa grass juice, organic broccoli (stalk & flower), organic navy bean (sprout), organic lentil bean (sprout), organic garbanzo bean (sprout), organic carrot (root), organic beet (root), organic kale (leaf). Organic Flavor Blend: Organic cane sugar, organic vanilla flavors. Raw Probiotic & Enzyme Blend: Lipase, protease, aspergillopepsin, beta-glucanase, cellulase, bromelain, phytase, lactase, papain, peptidase, pectinase, hemicellulase, xylanase, [lactobacillus plantarum, lactobacillus bulgaricus] (1.5 Billion CFU).

Manufactured in a facility that also processes egg, milk, soy and tree nuts. May contain traces of soy due to agricultural practices.

Warnings

 Packaged by weight and not volume. Settling may occur.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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How Much Protein is Too Much?

Protein is a vital contributor to muscle, bone, tissue and joint health, as one of the three macronutrients the human body needs. Before talking about how much you need, however, here’s a quick science lesson from Harvard Nutrition Source:

Woman's Hands Holding Chocolate Protein Powder Container to Represent Question of How Much Protein is Too Much | Vitacost Blog

Protein is made of organic compounds known as amino acids, which generate all cellular functions. There are nine essential amino acids the body cannot manufacture on its own. As such, these must be absorbed through foods rich in protein.

As such, a high-protein diet, combined with regular exercise, can boost your muscle strength, bone density, metabolic function and lean body mass, according to the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

However, consuming too much protein can also be risky. Get familiar with the indicators of excessive intake, and find out why it matters and how can you maintain a healthy protein balance for your fitness goals.

How the body reacts to excess protein levels

The Food and Function Journal explains that the body is designed to oxidize amino acids into water-soluble byproducts, such as ammonia—these are then used to fuel your cells and therefore your workout. When their job is done, they’re filtered out when you use the bathroom.

If you consume more protein than what can be metabolized in a single day, over time, you’ll experience excess ammonia because it remains in the body. This impacts how the liver, kidneys and intestines function, causing:

  • Dehydration
  • Intestinal discomfort
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Seizures
  • Heightened insulin
  • Toxins in the bloodstream
  • Increased risk of cardiovascular disease

How to know if you're eating too much protein

The upper limit for most active, healthy adults’ recommended daily allowance (RDA) of protein is 2 grams per kilogram of body weight. Endurance or strength trainers who consume protein to boost their athletic performance can have as much as 3.5 grams and still be within a safe range, according to the report, Dietary protein intake and human health.

Consuming higher levels of protein for an extended amount of time will lead to adverse physical effects. For example, in a study of 40 resistance-trained athletes who ingested 4.4 grams of protein over the course of 8 weeks, 10 dropped out because of a stated inability to tolerate that much protein. One individual also suffered gastrointestinal distress and chronic elevated body temperature.

While the increase in protein had no visible impact on their body composition, it lead to discomfort and unwanted health outcomes. If you start to observe these issues in your own body, it could be an early indicator of excessive protein intake.

How to determine your optimal protein intake

There are a number of variables that factor into your specific range of healthy protein consumption, including gender, body mass, exercise level and age bracket. As a baseline, however, you can plan for 15 to 20 percent of your entire daily caloric intake to come from protein.

For example, a 50-year-old woman, who is 140 pounds and is not active should consume 53 grams of protein on a daily basis, explains Harvard Health. If you’re not sure about the math, use the calculator from the Food and Nutrition Information Center as a starting point.

Another consideration to make is where your protein comes from. Whether you choose to eat plant-based proteins or animal-based proteins, it’s important to understand that not all protein-rich foods yield the same health benefits. To illustrate this point, Harvard Nutrition Source shares a breakdown of four different protein sources and how each of their nutritional profiles compare:

  • A 4-ounce beef sirloin steak contains 33 grams of protein, but it has 5 grams of saturated fat.
  • A 4-ounce ham steak contains 22 grams of protein and just 1.6 grams of saturated fat, but it has 1,500 milligrams of sodium.
  • A 4-ounce salmon contains 30 grams of protein, 1 gram of saturated fat, trace amounts of sodium, and is high in omega-3 fatty acids.
  • A 1-cup serving of lentils contains 18 grams of protein, 15 grams of fiber, and has virtually no saturated fat or sodium.

As you can see, not all protein is created equal. Consider the fat, sodium and caloric values when planning your meals to ensure you’re staying on track with all your health goals.

Know your protein needs

Don’t go overboard with protein. Instead, stick to the  proper daily allowance to be sure you’re giving your body what it needs, and avoiding the adverse effects of eating too much. However, you’ll more likely struggle with getting enough each day, so focus on regularly eating a diverse range of protein sources first and foremost.

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