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VPX BANG® RTD Citrus Twist -- 16 fl oz


VPX BANG® RTD Citrus Twist
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VPX BANG® RTD Citrus Twist -- 16 fl oz

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VPX BANG® RTD Citrus Twist Description

  • Super Creatine • BCAA Aminos • Ultra CoQ10
  • Potent Brain and Body Fuel
  • Natural Flavors

By the Makers of the Legendary

Redline Energy Products

 

Make no Mistake - BANG is not your stereotypical high sugar, life-sucking soda masquerading as an energy drink! High sugar drinks spike blood sugar producing metabolic mayhem causing you to crash harder than a test dummy into a brick wall. Power up with Bang's potent brain & body-rocking fuel: Creatine, Caffeine, & BCAAs (Branched Chain Amino Acids).

 

Life is an Xtreme Sport and Bang is the Xtreme Energy source to Live Life Xtreme!

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Can (16 fl oz)
Servings per Container: 1
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories0
   Calories from Fat0
Total Fat0 g0%
   Saturated Fat0 g0%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium40 mg2%
Potassium85 mg2%
Total Carbohydrate0 g0%
   Dietary Fiber0 g0%
   Sugars0 g
Protein0 g
Vitamin C50%
Niacin25%
Vitamin B625%
Vitamin B1225%
Magnesium2%
Not a significant source of vitamin A, calcium and iron.
Other Ingredients: Carbonated water, citric acid anhydrous, natural flavors, caffeine anydrous, sodium benzoate (preserves freshness), potassium citrate monohydrate, sucralose, L-leucine, potassium phosphate dibasic, vitamin C (ascorbic acid), acesulfame potassium, potassium sorbate (preserves freshness), magnesium chloride, Super Creatine™ (creatyl-L-leucine [creatine bonded to L-leucine]), L-isoleucine, L-valine, calcium chloride, calcium disodium EDTA, vitamin B3 (niacinamide), CoQ10 (coenzyme Q10), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), and vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin).
Warnings

Do not use this product if you are pregnant or nursing. Do not consume this product if you are taking any prescription drug and/or have any medical condition. The user of this product assumes all liability if this product is used in a manner not consistent with label guidelines.

 

This product contains caffeine and should not be used with any other caffeine containing products. This product is intended for use by healthy individuals only. Too much caffeine may cause nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness, and, occasionally, rapid heartbeat. Not recommended for use by children under 18 years of age. One serving provides 357 mg of caffeine which is more than three cups of coffee.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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A 5K Training Plan for Beginners

Whether you’re looking for a new challenge or just want to shake up your fitness routine, running a 5K race may be just the thing you need. Consisting of a 3.1 miles, a 5K can be run by anyone – even a beginner. It takes about two months to prepare. And with this guide, you’ll be pounding the pavement in no time.

Woman Training for a 5K Race Sitting Down on Boardwalk Tying Shoes Before She Goes for a Practice Rim | Vitacost.com/blog

How to start training for a 5K

Step 1 – Where to begin

The best way to get started is to find a local race that’s a few months away and commit to it. You can find local races by checking online, asking a local running store, or even at the gym. Fill out an entry form and pay the race fee; this will be the motivation you need to start your training. Another motivating tip is to get a friend to commit with you. This can make the training fun, and you’ll be each other’s support system.

Ok, you’re committed and the goal is set. What’s next?

Step 2 – Get the right equipment

The great thing about running is that you really only need to invest in a few things: a good pair of running shoes (old tennis shoes will not do!), socks, a watch and a water bottle. Definitely take the time to speak with someone at a specialty running store who understands the needs of a runner. Let them know you’re a newbie and preparing for your first race. They may ask you to hop on a treadmill in the store to see your stride and how your foot lands. Don’t be shy as this will be super helpful in finding the best shoe for your needs.

Step 3 – Set a schedule

When you’re new to running, don’t expect to start running miles on the first day. You wouldn’t head into a gym on your first day and use the heaviest weights possible. This would lead to injury, muscle soreness and mental defeat. Running is no different! You don’t need any excuses at the beginning of your training to skip days.

Begin with a walk/run combination. Doing this prepare your body slowly and gently, getting your joints and muscles gradually ready for running a long distance. 

Below is a sample walk/run schedule that can be used three times a week with rest days in between in order for the body to recover. You can even schedule shorter runs on weekdays and longer runs on the weekends. 

Beginner phase

Warm up walk for 5 minutes, then stretch.

Run 10 to 30 seconds; walk 1-2 minutes.

Complete a 20 to 30 minute workout.

(When this becomes easy move to intermediate phase.)

Intermediate phase

Warm up walk for 5 minutes, then stretch.

Run 1 to 5 minutes; walk 1-2 minutes.

Complete a 20 to 30 minute workout.

(When this phase becomes easy move to advanced phase.)

Advanced phase       

Warm up walk 5 minutes; then stretch.

Run 6 to 8 minutes; walk 30 seconds to 1 minute.

In this phase gradually add more minutes to your run and eventually omit walking,

Keeping a log of your runs in a workout journal is a good idea. You can log how far you ran, how many minutes it took, breaks needed and how you feel.

Also log, any activities you do, such as yoga, spin class or strength training, on the in between days.Remember it’s OK to keep up with your other workouts during race training; it can even enhance your running workouts.

Logging daily food intake can also be a good motivation to keep you focused on a healthy diet while training.

Step 4 – Keep it safe

Safety is always a top priority when running. 

Pick a familiar place with activity happening to run.

Keep your phone and identification with you at all times.

Only use headphones if you are in the gym using a treadmill.

Don’t run in the dark. With winter giving us less daylight, it’s best to run indoors once the sun goes down or if it hasn’t risen yet.

Check the temperature before heading out and dress appropriately.

Always warm up and cool down.

Hydrate before, during, and after your run.

At all times, if you need to stop, absolutely stop.Always listen to your body and take a break.

Step 5 – Race day

Make sure to get lots of rest the day before. 

Eat a small meal 2 hours before race time. Oatmeal with fruit and honey, or two slices of whole grain toast with jam and a piece of fruit are some good options. Tip: Try one of these meals beforehand (on a workout day) to see how your body feels, and adjust accordingly.

Along with your pre-race meal hydrate with about 20 ounces of fluids 2 to 3 hours before the race and about 7 to 10 ounces 20 minutes before race time.

Arrive early the morning of the race; this can help ease nerves some by giving you time to warm up, use the restroom and observe what’s going on. 

Look for other first-time racers and stand by them; you won’t feel alone and you might even make some new runner friends.

Your adrenaline will be pumping when you first start the race, so remind yourself to set a comfortable pace. You don’t want all of your energy gone in the first mile.

Break the race down mentally into four short distances, 1st mile, 2nd mile, 3rd mile, then to the finish!

Keep hydrated along the way.

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