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NOW Sports MCT Powder with Whey Protein Isolate Chocolate Mocha -- 16 oz


NOW Sports MCT Powder with Whey Protein Isolate Chocolate Mocha
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NOW Sports MCT Powder with Whey Protein Isolate Chocolate Mocha -- 16 oz

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NOW Sports MCT Powder with Whey Protein Isolate Chocolate Mocha Description

  • Sports Nutrition
  • 52% MCTs • Mixes Easily • Keto Fuel
  • Informed-Sport Trusted by Sport
  • Informed-Choice Trusted by Sport
  • Steroid Free
  • Non-GMO

This unique powder features a convenient blend of MCT oil and whey protein concentrate. The powder form can be blended into your morning coffee or smoothie – and it’s creamy. You get the benefits of quality fats and protein in a travel-friendly powder form. It’s made specifically for those leading a keto-friendly lifestyle with an ideal balance of 5 g of fat and just 1 g of protein. Enjoy as a shake between meals or pre- and post-workout!


Directions

Suggested Usage: Take 1 1/2 level tablespoons 1 to 2 times daily. Mix into coffee/tea, shakes/smoothies, yogurt/smoothie bowls, or even add to keto diet recipes.

 

Natural color variation may occur in this product.

Free Of
GMOs, steroid and hexane.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1-1/2 Tablespoon (10 g)
Servings per Container: About 45
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories60
Total Fat5 g6%
   Saturated Fat5 g25%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol Less than5 mg2%
Sodium50 mg2%
Total Carbohydrate3 g1%
   Dietary Fiber0 g0%
   Total Sugars1 g
     Includes 1g Added Sugars2%
Protein2 g
Vitamin D0 mcg0%
Calcium9 mg0%
Iron0 mg0%
Potassium14 mg0%
Other Ingredients: MCT oil (medium-chain triglycerides), whey protein concentrate, natural flavors, organic cocoa, sea salt, organic stevia leaf extract, silicon dioxide.
Contains Milk.

Medium-chain triglycerides from coconut/palm kernel oil.

Not manufactured with yeast, wheat, gluten, soy, egg, fish or shellfish ingredients. Produced in a GMP facility that processes other ingredients containing these allergens.

The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Is it Safe for Kids to Follow a Keto Diet?

Many people turn to the keto diet as a way to lose weight and regulate blood sugar levels—and it can be effective short-term, letting you drop pounds fast as long as you’re in ketosis and stick with the guidelines. Adolescent Child in Striped Red Shirt Eating Meal at Table to Represent Question Is Keto Safe for Kids | Vitacost.com/bog The keto diet involves forcing the body to use fat to burn fat (as opposed to using glucose, which comes from carbohydrates). Keto dieters consume 80% of calories from fat, 20% or less from protein and just 10% or less from carbohydrates. With only 20 to 25 grams of carbs consumed a day, it’s important to meal plan wisely and eat cabs when you need them most. While the diet can be successful for adults, some wonder – is keto safe for kids? Many children today follow specialty diets, such as plant-based, vegan or gluten-free, especially if they have parents who are following these diets. But, unlike these diets, keto comes with some potential health consequences for kids. Here’s what you need to know.

What are the risks?

For starters, even adults face risks on the keto diet. “For anyone, potential risks include nutrient deficiencies from not eating a wide variety of plant foods, liver problems due to having so much fat to metabolize, constipation and gut health issues, brain fog, low energy and more,” says Kelly Jones, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN. “There may even be issues with blood glucose regulation, as studies are controversial when it comes to whether the diet helps or harms those with diabetes, and cholesterol may increase, especially LDL or ‘bad’ cholesterol,” she continues. Plus if you’re looking to gain muscle and become fitter, it could also weaken your performance. “We also know it impairs performance in aerobic exercise, limited intensity and length of movement,” Jones adds.

What are the risks for kids, specifically?

To be fair, the keto diet was originally recommended for children with epilepsy, showing the ability to reduce frequency and severity of seizures. “If a child suffers from epilepsy, I advise speaking with their medical team about testing a well-planned ketogenic diet and ensure that there is a dietitian specializing in its therapeutic use in this population,” says Jones. Yet for the average child, being put on any restrictive diet can increase chances of body dissatisfaction and eating disorders, while also putting their physical health at risk. In addition, children put on a keto diet might not get enough nutrients based on the limited group of foods they can eat. “There’s a lack of fiber from carbohydrate foods, which can negatively impact gut health, which we know impacts the immune system, energy metabolism, mental health and more.” Children also need good gut bacteria to create a healthy gut microbiome as they grow. “While our gut bacteria can be damaged at any stage of life, the diversity we build and the bacteria that are most likely to thrive throughout adulthood for us are determined during childhood based on diet, illness, medication, and environment,” Jones explains. Lack of antioxidants from a variety of plant foods, such as fresh fruit and starchy veggies, may also have short and long term health consequences. And the other drawbacks mentioned for adults may also impact children, too. So it’s definitely important to consult with a physician or dietitian before putting your child on a keto diet.

The Takeaway

For epilepsy, the keto diet may be appropriate for a child. “While I would never recommend a child to be placed on a ketogenic diet without epilepsy, if a child does have epilepsy it is imperative that there is strict oversight from their medical providers including their doctor and dietitian,” Jones says. If they are put on the diet, it’s important to make sure they’re getting all the nutrients they need and enough calories altogether. A dietitian should be involved to recommend ways to obtain fiber and to otherwise support the gut microbiome, as disruptions in gut health during childhood are indicative of gut health and associated problems as adults. “The dietitian should also be recommending healthy fats from plants and fatty fish rather than saturated fats from animal products,” she says, as those are better for lowering inflammation and protecting against disease. So, nuts, seeds, olive oil and fish are better than fatty beef, pork or butter. Ultimately, it’s safest to not let kids follow a keto diet, but if you do want to give it a shot and see how it goes for them, do so very carefully.
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