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Garden of Life Organic Plant Protein Smooth Coffee -- 10 Servings


Garden of Life Organic Plant Protein Smooth Coffee

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Garden of Life Organic Plant Protein Smooth Coffee -- 10 Servings

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Garden of Life Organic Plant Protein Smooth Coffee Description

  • Non-GMO Project Verified
  • Certified Gluten Free
  • Certified Vegan
  • USDA Organic
  • Grain Free
  • Kosher

Garden of Life Sources clean, pure ingredients from organic family farms to bring you the best nutritional products in the world.

  • 15g of complete protein
  • Smooth, with no gritty texture
  • Tasty and flavorful
  • Live probiotics and enzymes
  • Gluten free, with no allergenic ingredients like soy, wheat and dairy

Super SMOOTH and delicious, Garden of Life's family friendly Grain Free Organic Plant Protein is packed with energy-giving protein and wholesome fiber.


Directions

Mix 1 level scoop in 8 ounces of cold water (scoop included). Delicious with unsweetened almond or rice milk, add fruit if desired. Or simply just add to your favorite smoothie recipe.
Free Of
GMOs, gluten, grain, dairy, soy, tree nuts, added sugars, filler ingredients, artificial flavorings, colors, sweeteners and preservatives.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Scoop (24 g)
Servings per Container: Approximately 10
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories90
  Calories from Fat15
Total Fat2 g3%
   Saturated Fat0 g
   Polyunsaturated Fat1 g
   Unsaturated Fat1 g
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium170 mg7%
Potassium50 mg1%
Total Carbohydrate5 g2%
   Dietary Fiber2 g8%
   Sugars0 g
Protein15 g30%
Calcium4%
Iron25%
Vitamin K15%
Thiamin2%
Riboflavin4%
Niacin4%
Folate2%
Biotin2%
Pantothenic Acid2%
Phosphorus20%
Magnesium6%
Zinc10%
Selenium4%
Copper15%
Manganese25%
Chromium2%
Molybdenum60%
Typical Amino Acid Profile
Alanine657 mg
Arginine1314 mg
Aspartic Acid1752 mg
Cysteine164 mg
Glutamic Acid2518 mg
Glycine602 mg
Histidine383 mg
Isoleucine *^712 mg
Leucine *^1314 mg
Lysine *1095 mg
Methionine *175 mg
Phenylalanine *821 mg
Proline657 mg
Serine766 mg
Threonine *547 mg
Tryptophan *164 mg
Tyrosine602 mg
Valine *^766 mg
*Essential Amino Acid
^Branched Chain Amino Acid
Not a significant source of Vitamin D
*Essential Amino Acids ^Branched Chain Amino Acids
Other Ingredients: Certified Organic Plant Protein Blend: [organic pea (seed), organic tapioca fiber, organic chia (seed), organic flax (seed), organic cranberry (seed), organic baobab (fruit), organic pumpkin (seed)], organic arabica coffee, organic coffee flavors, organic stevia extract (leaf), organic cinnamon, organic vanilla flavor, sea salt, Raw Enzyme Blend: [lipase, protease, aspergillopepsin, beta-glucanase, cellulose, bromelain, phytase, lactase, papain, peptidase, pectinase, hemicellulase, xylanase], Raw Probiotic Blend: [lactobacillus plantarum, lactobacillus bulgaricus] 1 Billion CFU.
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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4 Reasons Why a Vegetarian Diet is Good for the Environment

You can’t fault vegetarians who’ve got a beef with beef.

Data from the U.S. Geological Survey indicates it takes 150 gallons of water to produce one quarter-pound hamburger. By comparison, 60 to 100 gallons of water go toward producing 1 pound of wheat, 20 gallons toward producing one egg and 10 gallons toward producing 1 pound of chicken, with 1 gallon going toward production of one orange.

Couple Following a Vegetarian Diet for its Environmental Benefits Riding Bicycles in Park | Vitacost.com/blog

To be sure, a vegetarian diet doesn’t win on every count in the water-to-produce-food battle, but it’s easy to see that beef is the big loser among the five examples cited above.

In light of that, how does vegetarianism — free of beef and other meats — benefit not just water conservation but the environment overall? Advocates stress that the vegetarian lifestyle aids the planet in myriad ways.

“Animal agriculture plays a role in almost all of the major environmental issues that plague our earth — climate change, habitat loss and destruction, wildlife extinction, overconsumption, soil degradation, water pollution and air pollution, just to name a few,” says John Oppermann, executive director of the Earth Day Initiative.

Oppermann says it’s more efficient for people to eat plants, rather than people eating meat from animals that consume plants. In other words, vegetarianism removes a few links from the food chain.

“An agricultural system focused on livestock production is arguably not sustainable,” he says, “and we live in a world where sustainability needs to be everyone’s priority.”

Here are four key environmental benefits of vegetarianism.

1. It reduces animal-waste runoff and groundwater pollution.

Large-scale animal farms create tons of waste that can leach into the soil and pollute groundwater sources, according to longtime conservationist Terra Wellington, author of “The Mom’s Guide to Growing Your Family Green: Saving the Earth Begins at Home.” Animal-waste pollution pumps harmful phosphorous, nitrogen and antibiotics into rivers, lakes and other bodies of water, she adds.

In the U.S., animals raised on large-scale farms generate more than 1 million tons of manure each day — three times the amount generated by the U.S. population, according to Farm Sanctuary, a nonprofit that promotes the ethical treatment of farm animals.

2. It cuts down on greenhouse gases.

If there’s less demand for animal protein, Wellington says, then there’s less demand for livestock.

Livestock contributes nearly 15 percent of the world’s human-caused greenhouse gases, thanks to the methane gas that the animals release. A United Nations report published in 2006 found that raising cattle generates more greenhouse gases — a significant factor in global warming — than driving cars does.

“Livestock are one of the most significant contributors to today’s most serious environmental problems,” Henning Steinfeld, a livestock expert at the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, said when the report came out.

3. It helps preserve precious land resources.

Raising animals for food — including acreage allocated for growing feed crops and grazing — gobbles up 30 percent of the Earth’s land mass, according to Mercy For Animals, a nonprofit that works to protect farm animals. Of all the agricultural land in the U.S., 80 percent is reserved for raising animals for food and growing grains to feed them, according to PETA, the animal rights group.

4. It decreases animal cruelty.

As PETA notes, large-scale “factory” farming aims to produce the most meat and other products “as quickly and cheaply as possible and in the smallest amount of space possible, resulting in abusive conditions for animals.” Cow, pigs, chickens, turkeys and other factory-farm animals typically are kept in small cages or stalls, often barely able to move, PETA says.

While pro-vegetarian organizations such as PETA tout the advantages of a meat-free existence, not everyone is entirely in vegetarianism’s corner. A Carnegie Mellon University study published in 2015 raised red flags about the pro-environment aspects of vegetarianism.

A news release about the study implied that following federal guidelines for eating more fruits, vegetables, dairy and seafood actually does more harm to the environment than adhering to a meat-based diet. Specifically, consuming the suggested “healthier” foods bumps up energy use, fresh-water use and greenhouse gas emissions, the news release suggested.

“Eating lettuce is over three times worse in greenhouse gas emissions than eating bacon,” study co-author Paul Fischbeck, a Carnegie Mellon professor, is quoted as saying in the news release. “Lots of common vegetables require more resources per calorie than you would think. Eggplant, celery and cucumbers look particularly bad when compared to pork or chicken.”

Responding to criticism about the study’s juxtaposition of a vegetarian-oriented diet and a meat-oriented diet on a per-calorie basis, Fischbeck and colleague Michelle Tom explained that they harbor no ill will toward veggies as a whole.

“You can’t lump all vegetables together and say they’re good,” Fischbeck told The Huffington Post. “You can’t lump all meat together and say it’s bad.”

The Huffington Post characterized the study as determining that “not every plant product is more environmentally friendly than every meat product.”

“So, yes, some vegetables can be worse for the environment than some meat,” The Huffington Post concluded, “but if you’re looking for an excuse to keep throwing back the burgers guilt-free, this [study] isn’t it.”

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