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Nature's Plus Fruitein® High Protein Vegetarian Energy Shake Acai -- 2500 million cells - 1.2 lbs


Nature's Plus Fruitein® High Protein Vegetarian Energy Shake Acai

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Nature's Plus Fruitein® High Protein Vegetarian Energy Shake Acai -- 2500 million cells - 1.2 lbs

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Nature's Plus Fruitein® High Protein Vegetarian Energy Shake Acai Description

  • High Protein Energy Shake
  • Vegetarian

Featuring the anti-aging, antioxidant power of the world's most popular superfruit, FRUITEIN Acai Shake packs 2500 mg of superior quality acai berry standardized extract and whole fruit concentrate into each luscious, mouthwatering serving. FRUITEIN Acai Shake adds variety and taste satisfaction to the most extensive line of acai products available, including capsules, extended release tablets, mini-tabs, liquid, and specialized formulations.

 

Acai berry is clearly the world's most popular superfruit for anti-aging, energizing, cardiovascular, digestive, and metabolic support. With an outstanding ORAC value of 2000, every smooth and sumptuous serving of FRUITEIN Acai Shake supplies this comprehensive acai activity along with vitamins, minerals, complete vegetarian protein, and more than 115 whole foods.


Directions

Add one measuring scoop of Fruitein to 6 fl oz of water and mix in blender or shake until smooth. For those who prefer a thicker, richer shake, Fruitein may also be mixed with 8 fl oz of milk. For best results, water or milk should be very cold.
Free Of
Gluten.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Scoop (34 g)
Servings per Container: 16
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories110
   Calories from Fat0
Total Fat0 g0%
   Saturated Fat0 g0%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium130 mg5%
Potassium110 mg3%
Total Carbohydrate15 g5%
   Dietary Fiber1 g4%
   Sugars13 g
   Sugar Alcohol0 g
   Other Carbohydrate1 g
Protein10 g20%
Vitamin A5000 IU100%
Vitamin C60 mg100%
Calcium250 mg35%
Iron4.5 mg25%
Vitamin D400 IU100%
Vitamin E30 IU100%
Thiamin1.5 mg100%
Riboflavin1.7 mg100%
Niacin20 mg100%
Vitamin B62 mg100%
Folic Acid400 mcg100%
Vitamin B126 mcg100%
Biotin300 mcg100%
Pantothenic Acid10 mg100%
Phosphorus250 mg25%
Iodine150 mcg100%
Magnesium140 mg35%
Zinc15 mg100%
Selenium21 mcg30%
Manganese5 mg250%
Chromium18 mcg15%
Molybdenum20 mcg25%
Each Serving of FRUITEIN® Acai Shake Also Contains:
NUTRIENTS
Euterpe oleracea (acai extract [standardized 10% phenolics] and acai whole fruit concentrate)2500 mg*
Inositol50 mg*
Citrus Bioflavonoid Complex25 mg*
Choline (bitartrate)21 mg*
ENZYMES
Bromelain (pineapple) (18 GDU [gelatin digesting units])30 mg*
Papain (papaya) (60,000 units)30 mg*
Amylase (600 units) (brown rice fermentation)20 mg*
Lipase (50 units) (brown rice fermentation)10 mg*
Cellulase (50 units) (brown rice fermentation)10 mg*
WHOLE FOOD BASE:
Spirulina, Oat Bran, Carrot Powder, Rice Bran, Acerola Cherry, Lecithin, Young Barley Leaf, Spanish Bee Pollen, Kelp, Pineapple, Papaya, Apple Pectin, Black Currant Seed and Amla (Emblica officinalis)
HERBAL BASE:
Astragalus, Schisandra, Ligustrum and Korean Ginseng
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Proprietary non-GMO blend (rice protein, pea protein and soy [isolated soy protein and fermented soy]), fructose, acai berry extract, maltodextrin, tricalcium phosphate, potassium citrate, magnesium oxide, guar gum, psyllium, oat bran, amla fruit, microcrystalline cellulose, spirulina, vitamin C (ascorbic acid), Proprietary Whole Food Blend [dried barley juice, spirulina, cooked whole brown rice, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), chlorella (broken cell), Pacific kelp, Phenalgin™ (Cystoseira canariensis), cryptomodales, red kelp (Palmaria palmata), brown kelp (Laminaria digitata), ulva (Ulva rigida & Ulva fasciata), red seaweed (Lithothamnium calcarium), dulse (Rhodymenia palmata), rockweed (Ascophyllum nodosum), Spanish bee pollen, sunflower oil, black currant seed oil, apple, apricot, banana, camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia), cranberry, orange, peach, red raspberry, strawberry, tomato, alfalfa sprout, barley grass juice, beet greens, cabbage, onion bulb, parsley, celery seed, papaya fruit, red grape, broccoli floret, carrot, garlic, spinach, milk thistle seed, Chinese green teea (decaffeinated), turmeric, red wine (Vitis vinifera fruit concentrate) (alcohol free), pau d'Arco, ginkgo biloba, Korean ginseng, astragalus, echinacea angustifolia, Irish moss, thyme, ligustrum berry, rice bran, white nectarine, white peach, white fig, date, banana, potato, white pear (Pyrus bretschneiden) white tea, jicama (Pachyrhizyus erosus), Jerusalem artichoke, shiitake mushroom (lentinus edodes), parsnip, turnip, cauliflower, ginger, kohlrabi, shallot, mango, grapefruit, yellow apple, pear, honeydew melon, pineapple, yellow squash, gooseberry, golden kiwi, nectarine, yellow watermelon, pumpkin, butternut squash, yellow fig, cantaloupe, yellow beet, rutabaga, tangerine, lemon, yellow pepper, lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium), blackberry (Rubus fruticosus), elderberry (Sambucus nigra), lingonberry extract, plum, black cherry extract, purple fig, Belgian endive, passion fruit, purple kale, rhubarb, concord grape (V. labrusca), beet, radicchio, eggplant, pomegranate extract, purple onion, wolfberry (goji), black currant extract, noni, mangosteen, acai, black raspberry, bilberry, highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum), schisandra, fenugreek, guava, watermelon], vitamin E acetate, choline bitartrate, inositol, apple pectin, Spanish bee pollen, niacinamide, vitamin A palmitate, zinc oxide, manganese sulfate, ferrous fumarate, calcium pantothenate, amylase, lipase, cellulase, schisandra, rice bran, black currant seed, oat bran, Korean ginseng, acerola cherry, papaya, astragalus, apple pectin, pineapple, young barley leaves, ligustrum, carrot, kelp, lecithin, lemon bioflavonoids, papaya, bromelain, chlorophyll, pyrodoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin, vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), thiamine hydrochloride, vitamin D (ergocalciferol), folic acid, biotin, potassium iodide, chromium chloride, sodium selenite, sodium molybdate, Activessence® (cellulase, pectinase, hemicellulase and xylanase).
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Plant Protein is Wildly Popular - Here's a Guide to the Many Different Types

More and more people have a beef with red meat. Sure, it’s a valuable source of protein — a 3-ounce serving of the leanest ground beef delivers 18 grams of protein. But it’s also a source of potential health problems; research ties red meat to a heightened risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers.

Therefore, Americans are seeking protein alternatives. That’s where plant proteins come in. According to a 2019 survey by the International Food Information Council Foundation, nearly one-fourth of U.S. consumers said they’d stepped up consumption of plant protein in the previous year.

Overhead View of White Table With a Chalkboard & Various Bowls and Plates Filled With an Assortment of the Best Plant Protein Sources | Vitacost.com/blog

So, if you hope to rely more on plant proteins, how do you know which ones to pick? What are their pros and cons? In this guide, we’ll review some of the common types of plant proteins and explain what some of the key differences are. First, here’s a rundown of some of the most significant sources of plant protein.

Plant Protein Sources

Legumes

  • 1 cup of boiled lentils, 18g
  • 1 cup of cooked edamame, 17g
  • 1 cup of peas, 8g
  • 1 ounce of peanuts, 7g

Nuts

Seeds

Grains

Vegetables

  • 1 cup of cooked artichokes, 5.8g
  • 1 cup of cooked sweet yellow corn, 5.4g
  • 1 cup of cooked asparagus, 4.3g
  • 1 cup of cooked Brussels sprouts, 4g
  • 1 cup of cooked, chopped broccoli, 3.8g

As you can see, some plants pack more of a protein punch than others, meaning it’s best to mix sources of protein to reach the recommended daily intake of this macronutrient. The amount of protein you should consume each day depends on your age, gender and physical activity, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). To find out the level that’s right for you, visit choosemyplate.gov/protein-foods.

Protein intake isn’t the only deciding factor when choosing plant proteins, though. Other dietary concerns come into play. Here are a few of them.

Other things to consider when choosing plant protein sources

Amino acids

Amino acids play a key role in determining the quality of a protein source.

Melissa Morris, a professor of nutrition and applied kinesiology at the University of Tampa and a part-time writer for Exercise.com, explains that amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Most plant proteins lack all of the amino acids that we need to get from food, she says. However, Morris adds, you can combine various kinds of protein to obtain the proper amount of all 20 amino acids. For instance, you might eat quinoa to get the amino acid lysine and soy to get the amino acid leucine.

Nine of the amino acids are classified as “essential,” meaning your body can’t manufacture them, so you must get them from food. Animal proteins offer all nine of those amino acids, while plant proteins don’t.

Calories

When it comes to calorie counts, not all proteins are created equal. For example, beans, peas and lentils characteristically are low-calorie foods, while 2 tablespoons of smooth peanut butter supply 188 calories. This doesn’t mean you should cut peanut butter out of your diet entirely; instead, you should closely monitor how much peanut butter you’re eating to ensure you’re not going nuts.

Fat

Generally, nuts are loaded with protein. But some of them also are loaded with fat. For instance, 1 ounce of almonds has 14 grams of fat and walnuts weigh in at 18.5 grams per ounce.

Don’t let the fat in nuts deter you from including them in your diet, though. Nuts contain healthy fats and are rich in antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Just be sure to keep an eye on your daily fat intake from nuts (or any other source of plant protein).

Fiber

Some kinds of plant protein, such as tofu, don’t offer bushels of fiber. However, beans, chia seeds, nuts and whole grains are among the myriad sources of plant protein that can more than fulfill your daily needs for fiber.

Nutrients

Plant proteins usually are chock-full of nutrients other than protein, according to Morris. For example, beans, edamame, nuts, quinoa and tofu serve up a slew of vitamins and minerals.

“Plant proteins also tend to be low in saturated fat and have no cholesterol, which are found in many animal proteins,” Morris says.

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