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Luke's Organic Cheddar Clouds White Cheddar Cheese Puffs -- 4 oz


Luke's Organic Cheddar Clouds White Cheddar Cheese Puffs
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Luke's Organic Cheddar Clouds White Cheddar Cheese Puffs -- 4 oz

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Luke's Organic Cheddar Clouds White Cheddar Cheese Puffs Description

  • Snack Like A Kid, Live Like A Grown Up®
  • USDA Organic
  • Certified Gluten Free
  • Non-GMO
  • Kosher
  • Product of USA

Hi, I'm Luke.

 

I was diagnosed with Celiac disease when I was 7 years old and I've been on the lookout for good-tasting gluten-free snacks ever since. Finally, here's one that doesn't taste like tree bark. You'll be so happy, you'll eat the whole bag.

 

Luke's Products Are:

  • Made in California
  • Organic
  • Gluten-Free
  • Soy-Free
  • Peanut/Tree-Nut Free
  • Whole Grain
  • Non-GMO
  • Kosher

Free Of
Gluten, soy, dairy, peanuts, tree nuts (nuts), GMOs.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 oz (28 g)
Servings per Container: About 4
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories138
   Calories from Fat54
Total Fat6 g9%
   Saturated Fat1 g2%
   Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Sodium240 mg6%
Total Carbohydrate19 g6%
   Dietary Fiber0 g0%
   Sugars0 g
Protein2 g
Vitamin A0%
Vitamin C0%
Calcium2%
Iron0%
Other Ingredients: Organic whole grain corn, organic rice, Luke's Organic Oil Blend (sunflower oil, safflower oil and/or red palm olein), organic cheddar cheese ((organic cultured pasteurized milk, salt, enzymes), and/or organic nonfat milk, organic lactose, organic whey, organic buttermilk, salt, disodium phosphate).
Contains: Milk Ingredients.
The product packaging you receive may contain additional details or may differ from what is shown on our website. We recommend that you reference the complete information included with your product before consumption and do not rely solely on the details shown on this page. For more information, please see our full disclaimer.
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Good News, Cheese Lovers: Research Stresses Benefits of Dairy Foods

Health experts long have warned people to moderate their intake of milk and to say "no thanks" to an extra sprinkle of shredded cheese.

Eating too much dairy was believed to contribute to everything from cardiovascular disease to cancer. But now, researchers say those fears might be misplaced.

Findings unveiled at the ESC Congress 2018 -- the annual congress of the European Society of Cardiology -- suggest that rather than harming you, consuming dairy products protects against both total mortality and mortality traced to cerebrovascular causes.

Researchers at the congress recommended loosening restrictions on how much dairy a person eats -- particularly cheese and yogurt.

Assorted Wedges of Cheese Arranged in Circle on White Board to Represent Benefits of Dairy | Vitacost.com/blog

Despite the good news, it appears that one negative health impact – an increased risk of coronary heart disease from drinking milk – remains.

However, even that negative finding doesn’t mean you have to give up the white stuff. Instead, the researchers simply recommend drinking nonfat or low-fat milk.

The findings are good news for proponents of eating dairy products such as Toby Amidor, a registered dietitian and author of “Smart Meal Prep for Beginners” and “The Healthy Meal Prep Cookbook.”

“Studies show that consumption of three servings of dairy per day result in a better diet quality,” she says.

The benefits of dairy

Amidor lauds the positive power of eating dairy foods. Her family in Israel were dairy farmers, and she is an ambassador for the National Dairy Council. 

Eating dairy foods has several benefits, she says. Some studies have found that people who consume dairy might find it easier to maintain a healthy weight. For example, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that people who increase their intake of yogurt gain less weight.

In addition, adding dairy to your diet might help reduce the risk of several diseases, including:

Milk contains nine essential nutrients, Amidor says. “Three of the nutrients are underconsumed by Americans and are identified by the dietary guidelines as nutrients of concern,” she says. The three are

Adding dairy to your diet

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that you consume low-fat or fat-free dairy products. Doing so reduces both the number of calories and amount of saturated fat you consume.

Adults, teens and older children should eat 3 cups of dairy foods each day. Children ages 4 to 8 can get by with 2.5 cups, and children ages 2 and 3 should have 2 cups.

Drinking milk is an easy way to get more dairy into your daily routine. Drinking skim milk gives you all the nutrients, yet fewer calories and less saturated fat than whole milk. Plus, “it tastes great,” Amidor says.

If you don’t like drinking milk, there are many other ways to get your full allotment of dairy, Amidor says. They include consuming Greek yogurt, kefir, cottage cheese and cheese.

“You can also use milk in dishes like ice pops, cream in a soup, batters, scrambled eggs and more,” she says.

Other tips to remember when adding dairy to your diet include:

  • Choose yogurt more often than cheese. Yogurt typically has more potassium and less sodium than cheese. Just make sure to look for yogurts with low levels of added sugar.
  • Look for “reduced-fat” or “low-fat” cheese. A cheese with this label will be lower in saturated fat.
  • Skip cream cheese, butter and cream. Despite popular belief, these foods are not part of the “dairy food group,” according to the USDA. They have little or no calcium, but plenty of saturated fat.
  • Add milk to your coffee. Using fat-free or low-fat milk in your coffee – instead of cream – is a great way to boost your dairy intake.
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